5 Misconceptions About Dyeing Your Armpit Hair That You Definitely Shouldn't Let Stop You From Doing It

It's not just Miley Cyrus: The dyed armpit hair trend is gaining traction with every day fashionistas as well. With something so unexpected, colorful, and (perhaps best of all) easily reversed when the time comes for a change, it's easy to see why a beauty craze like dyed armpits would gain some serious traction. I myself dipped into the trend for a couple months, and my experience rocking green underarm fuzz was a pleasant, yet somewhat interrogatory one.

It seemed that every time I lifted up my arm, I was met with a new game of 20 questions. The questions weren't exactly negative. Don't get me wrong, most people seemed to like my colored armpits, some even seemed as if they wanted to try the trend out themselves. The questions, for the most part, came from fear and confusion on how the look is achieved. Since the answer to most of these questions is "easily," I've compiled a list of the biggest questions I got, and answers that might just convince you to take the plunge into the pool of armpit-related self expression.

1. "Won't the dye stain your clothes?"

The short answer? Not if you play your cards right. You wouldn't break out fresh white sheets immediately after dyeing your hair a bright color, would you? Just think of your newly-dyed pits the same way. For the first few days, depend more on dark colors and sleeveless tops. After you take a couple showers and any leftover pigment from the dyeing process has been washed away, you're free to wear whatever your heart desires. As a cautionary tale, however, above is a poor little pastel purple crop top I ruined by rushing out the door after just dyeing my armpits.

If you're concerned about sweat making the dye run, believe me when I say you're in the clear. The pigment you're worried about is trapped inside your hair follicles, and a little perspiration isn't going to change that. If it makes you feel better, there's always antiperspirant!

2. "Isn't putting hair dye on my skin really harmful?"

There are plenty of hair dyes out there that are A-OK for dyeing body hair! Vegetable-based dyes like Manic Panic, Special Effects, Directions, Adore, and Punky Color are all made from natural ingredients and completely safe for any part of your body. Plus, you can find them in any beauty supply store. If you're still a little doubtful, there are even dyes out there, like Betty Beauty, that are made specifically for use on body hair.

3. "What happens when I decide I don't want colored armpits anymore?"

You have two options: 1) Shave it off. The dye won't leave any stains on your skin, so it'll be an instant fix. 2) Wait it out. Body hair grows significantly not only grows significantly faster than the hair on your head — anywhere from 0.48 cm-1.5 cm a month as opposed to your scalp, which can range from 0.027 cm-1 cm — but body hair had a much shorter anagen, or growth, phase, meaning hairs shed and regenerate at a much fast speed. Give it a few weeks, and you'll be back to your normal hair color.

4. "My armpit hair is dark. Can I still do it?"

My body hair is naturally black, so this was initially my first concern when dyeing my own armpits. Though it may sound scary, there are ways to bleach your armpit hair before adding a bright hue. Your best bet is to find facial bleach, which can typically be bought in beauty supply stores. Your next best option is a low volume hair bleach. If you do this, only leave it on for 10 minute intervals, reapplying for another 10 minutes if the color isn't light enough. After, give your pits a good wash, and you're ready to dye! I have tried both bleach options by the way, and no, neither of them hurt or burn your skin.

5. "What if it doesn't look good on me?

Remember, anything looks good on anyone if they carry themselves with confidence. Rock your fancy new pits with pride, and people will take notice. Simple as that.

Images: Chloe Mackey (2); Steven Depolo, Mr.TinDC/Flickr