23 Wedding Readings From Jane Austen To Show Off How Ardently You Love Your Partner

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Are you a Janeite who has secured a single person in possession of a large fortune? If you've found your perfect match, I have 24 wedding readings from Jane Austen's novels that will bring some sense and sensibility to your I dos, so do yourself a favor and take the time to look through this great roundup before you finalize your ceremony plans.

In a world where time, location, and finances seem to limit almost every aspect of your wedding's scope, we can all celebrate the fact that wedding readings offer endless opportunities for customization. Use your favorite quotes and passages from books, music, and movies — go wild with them. You can always pick out your favorite quotes from your favorite books and put them to work in your celebration.

Jane Austen fans have a lot to choose from when it comes to making their wedding reflect their favorite reading options. There's almost enough Austen-related merchandise out there to build your own Jane Austen-branded wedding registry! And that's not to mention all the fantastic quotes about life and love that the Regency author penned.

Check out the 23 wedding readings from Jane Austen quotes that I've picked out for you below:

"If I loved you less, I might be able to talk about it more. But you know what I am. You hear nothing but truth from me. I have blamed you, and lectured you, and you have borne it as no other woman... would have borne it."

— Mr. Knightley, from Emma

"[T]hough a very few hours spent in the hard labor of incessant talking will despatch more subjects than can really be in common between any two rational creatures, yet with lovers it is different. Between THEM no subject is finished, no communication is even made, till it has been made at least twenty times over."

"Where the heart is really attached, I know very well how little one can be pleased with the attention of anybody else. Everything is so insipid, so uninteresting, that does not relate to the beloved object!"

— Isabella Thorpe, from Northanger Abbey

"In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you."

— Mr. Darcy, from Pride and Prejudice

"There will be little rubs and disappointments everywhere, and we are all apt to expect too much; but then, if one scheme of happiness fails, human nature turns to another; if the first calculation is wrong, we make a second better: we find comfort somewhere."

"I can listen no longer in silence. I must speak to you by such means as are within my reach. You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope. Tell me not that I am too late, that such precious feelings are gone for ever. I offer myself to you again with a heart even more your own than when you almost broke it.... Dare not say that man forgets sooner than woman, that his love has an earlier death. I have loved none but you."

— Captain Wentworth, from Persuasion

"She was assured of his affection; and that heart in return was solicited, which, perhaps, they pretty equally knew was already entirely his own; for, though Henry was now sincerely attached to her, though he felt and delighted in all the excellencies of her character and truly loved her society, I must confess that his affection originated in nothing better than gratitude, or, in other words, that a persuasion of her partiality for him had been the only cause of giving her a serious thought. It is a new circumstance in romance, I acknowledge, and dreadfully derogatory of an heroine's dignity; but if it be as new in common life, the credit of a wild imagination will at least be all my own."

— from Northanger Abbey

"It is not time or opportunity that is to determine intimacy; it is disposition alone. Seven years would be insufficient to make some people acquainted with each other, and seven days are more than enough for others."

— Marianne Dashwood, from Sense and Sensibility

"My good qualities are under your protection, and you are to exaggerate them as much as possible; and, in return, it belongs to me to find occasions for teasing and quarrelling with you as often as may be."

— Mr. Darcy, Pride and Prejudice

"Having once set out, and felt that he had done so on this road to happiness, there was nothing on the side of prudence to stop him or make his progress slow; no doubts of her deserving, no fears of opposition of taste, no need of drawing new hopes of happiness from dissimilarity of temper. Her mind, disposition, opinions, and habits wanted no half-concealment, no self-deception on the present, no reliance on future improvement.... His happiness in knowing himself to have been so long the beloved of such a heart, must have been great enough to warrant any strength of language in which he could clothe it to her or to himself; it must have been a delightful happiness."

— from Mansfield Park

"[She] was one of those, who, having once begun, would be always in love."

— from Emma

"[N]othing was to be retracted or qualified. He persisted in having loved none but her. She had never been supplanted. He never even believed himself to see her equal."

— from Persuasion

"[Her] feelings... were now safely lodged in perfect bliss; and with spirits elated to rapture, with [her partner] at her heart... she had been introduced into scenes where pleasures of every kind had met her. Her feelings, her preferences, had each known the happiness of a return. Wherever she felt attachment, she had been able to create it."

— from Northanger Abbey

"Had Elizabeth been able to encounter his eye, she might have seen how well the expression of heartfelt delight, diffused over his face, became him; but, though she could not look, she could listen, and he told her of feelings, which, in proving of what importance she was to him, made his affection every moment more valuable."

— from Pride and Prejudice

"With so much true merit and true love, and no want of fortune and friends, the happiness of the married [couple] must appear as secure as earthly happiness can be. Equally formed for domestic life, and attached to country pleasures, their home was the home of affection and comfort."

— from Mansfield Park

"There is no charm equal to tenderness of heart.... There is nothing to be compared to it. Warmth and tenderness of heart, with an affectionate, open manner, will beat all the clearness of head in the world, for attraction: I am sure it will."

— Emma Woodhouse, from Emma

"My idea of good company... is the company of clever, well-informed people, who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company."

— Anne Elliot, from Persuasion

"There is nothing I would not do for those who are really my friends. I have no notion of loving people by halves; it is not my nature. My attachments are always excessively strong."

— Isabella Thorpe, from Northanger Abbey

"[S]ometimes I have kept my feelings to myself, because I could find no language to describe them in but what was worn and hackneyed out of all sense and meaning."

— Marianne Dashwood, from Sense and Sensibility

"I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look, or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun."

— Mr. Darcy, from Pride and Prejudice

"He is lively, you are serious; but so much the better: his spirits will support yours. It is your disposition to be easily dejected and to fancy difficulties greater than they are. His cheerfulness will counteract this. He sees difficulties nowhere: and his pleasantness and gaiety will be a constant support to you. Your being so far unlike... does not in the smallest degree make against the probability of your happiness together: do not imagine it. I am myself convinced that it is rather a favourable circumstance. I am perfectly persuaded that the tempers had better be unlike: I mean unlike in the flow of the spirits, in the manners, in the inclination for much or little company, in the propensity to talk or to be silent, to be grave or to be gay. Some opposition here is, I am thoroughly convinced, friendly to matrimonial happiness. I exclude extremes, of course; and a very close resemblance in all those points would be the likeliest way to produce an extreme."

— Edmund Bertram, from Mansfield Park

"[A] sanguine temper, though for ever expecting more good than occurs, does not always pay for its hopes by any proportionate depression. It soon flies over the present failure, and begins to hope again."

— from Emma

"Who can be in doubt of what followed? When any two young people take it into their heads to marry, they are pretty sure by perseverance to carry their point, be they ever so poor, or ever so imprudent, or ever so little likely to be necessary to each other's ultimate comfort. This may be bad morality to conclude with, but I believe it to be truth; and if such parties succeed, how should [this couple], with the advantage of maturity of mind, consciousness of right, and one independent fortune between them, fail of bearing down every opposition? They might in fact, have borne down a great deal more than they met with, for there was little to distress them beyond the want of graciousness and warmth."

— from Persuasion