A 6th Woman Accuses Roy Moore Of Sexual Misconduct, Saying He Grabbed Her Butt

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Five women have already accused the Alabama GOP Senate candidate of acting inappropriately with women and young girls. On Wednesday, a sixth accuser alleged that Roy Moore groped her when she was in his law firm's office in 1991. While addressing the initial five women's allegations, Moore denied the accusations while calling them "absolutely false."

The accuser, Tina Johnson, accused Moore of sexual misconduct while speaking with AL.com and said that she visited his office in the fall of 1991 with her mother. Johnson's mother Mary Katherine Cofield, she said, was in contact with Moore who was handling Cofield's custody petition for her 12-year-old son.

According to Johnson, Moore allegedly flirted with her as soon as she entered his office with her mother. "He kept commenting on my looks, telling me how pretty I was, how nice I looked. He was saying that my eyes were beautiful," she said. Johnson said the then-attorney's compliments had made her uneasy while she was sitting in the office. "I was thinking," she told AL.com, "can we hurry up and get out of here?"

After the meeting with Moore was over, Johnson said her mother headed out of the door before her. According to Johnson, Moore allegedly followed behind her and "grabbed" her buttocks. "He didn't pinch it; he grabbed it," Johnson said. She said she was so stunned by his alleged behavior that she didn't say anything and didn't inform her mother.

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Johnson told AL.com that she told her sister about the incident and how Moore had made her uncomfortable with his alleged sexual misconduct. Her sister confirmed to the website that Johnson told her about that disturbing day. AL.com confirmed that Johnson and her mother went to the Gadsden office in 1991 after verifying court documents with Moore's signature on Cofield's custody petition as an attorney.

The sixth accuser said that her past life may not make her the perfect victim that the American public would believe but she insisted that her allegation was not motivated by political alliances or agendas. "I'm not perfect. I have things in my background and I know [the public] will jump on anything, but [what happened in 1991] is still the truth, and the truth will stand when the world won't," she said.

Johnson is the sixth woman to accuse Moore of inappropriate sexual behavior. The Alabama GOP candidate has strongly denied all allegations. After a fifth woman, Brenda Nelson, accused Moore of sexually assaulting her when she was a minor, the Republican runner told reporters, "I want to make it perfectly clear, the people of Alabama know me, they know my character, they know what I've stood for in the political world for over 40 years. And I can tell you without hesitation this is absolutely false."

Some of Moore's supporters have called the allegations "disingenuous." Alabama Rep. Ed Henry told Anderson Cooper on CNN, "It is disingenuous in my opinion for 50-something-year-old women to come forward four weeks prior to a major senatorial election." The same representative told reporters, "Roy Moore is the victim. He is the victim of a political hack job." He also called the Republicans that have criticized and pulled support from Moore "cowards."

Johnson feared being maligned as someone with a nefarious political agenda and told AL.com that it took her a considerable amount of time to come forward with these accusations as it is difficult for victims of sexual assault to speak openly about their painful experiences. But she came forward ultimately and explained that her decision to do so was based on morals and her identity as a practicing Christian. "This is not a politics thing with me. It's more of a moral and religious thing," Johnson said.