The Map Of The Solar Eclipse 2017 Path Shows Who Will See The Path Of Totality

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If you've done your homework on the upcoming total solar eclipse (happening August 21 — mark your calendars!), you know that the place to be is in the path of totality, which allows you to see the moon completely cover the sun. Since this is only the case for certain cities, a map of the solar eclipse 2017 path will come in handy to help you determine if you can expect the total black-out effect that this type of eclipse is known for.

The people with the best seats in the house are the ones who are dead center in the shadow of the moon, which helps explain why not everyone will experience an identical view of the eclipse. For these lucky folks, the moon's shadow will appear the same size as the sun. The path of the eclipse starts in northwest Oregon (think Salem) and will travel on a gradual southeast slope before ending in South Carolina and heading for the Atlantic.

Other cities that will lay in the path of totality include Idaho Falls, Idaho, and Nashville, Tennessee. To see if your location is in the path, you can check out the maps below. You guys are in for a real treat (but don't forget your solar eclipse viewers!).

Now, what does this mean for all of the cities not a part of the path of totality? Instead of seeing the moon completely block out the sun, you'll still see a portion of the sun showing — which will vary depending on where you're located. Don't think this will make it any less of an experience, though. You're still getting to watch something that won't happen again until 2019!

At the start of the show, the partial eclipse will begin in Oregon at 9:05 a.m. PDT, with the sun being completely obscured at 10:18 a.m. PDT. You can see the complete list of times for each city at timeanddate.com. And remember, friends: if you plan on looking directly at the eclipse, regular sunglasses won't cut it. Head to 7-Eleven, Walmart, Lowe's, or another store to buy solar eclipse viewers and keep your eyes protected.