Tupac's Murder Weapon Was Reportedly Found In 1998... And Then It Disappeared

2PacVEVO/YouTube

In a twisted series of events, a new documentary recently discovered that the murder weapon used to kill Tupac Shakur was reportedly found. It turns out that the handgun, a .40 caliber Glock, was reportedly retrieved by the authorities in 1998, but later mysteriously disappeared as the investigation into the hip-hop legend's murder continued. According to TMZ, producers of the A&E docuseries, Who Killed Tupac?, were responsible for uncovering the long lost police document that sheds light on some details surrounding the missing firearm.

The gun was reportedly found in someone's backyard and later turned over to the authorities. The weapon was booked as property on May 30, 1998, with the Compton Police Department, according to Compton PD records uncovered by producers, and was one of 3,800 firearms turned over to the Los Angeles Sheriff's Department when the Compton PD was folded into it in 2000. However, it reportedly wasn't until 2006 that Deputy T. Brennan came across the document and recognized the address where the gun was found: the home of a girlfriend of a prominent Crip gang member, who TMZ reports was known to have beef with Tupac. The discovery led to a series of ballistic testing that reportedly determined that the firearm was, in fact, the weapon responsible for shooting and killing the 25-year-old rapper, according to the documentary's findings.

While it remains unclear why someone wouldn't turn the pistol over as evidence in Tupac's Las Vegas murder investigation, TMZ reports that a federal prosecutor had "concerns the discovery might alert potential conspirators — and recommended the gun NOT be turned over to LVPD." And, according to A&E, officers at the Las Vegas Police Department either denied that the gun was turned over to them or were unsure if it was.

2PacVEVO on YouTube

A snippet from the documentary, which was shared by TMZ, reveals the moment that Benjamin Crump, the attorney who is producing the series about the entertainer's death, tells Tupac's brother, Mopreme Shakur, that the murder weapon had been found some 19 years ago. To say that Mopreme was blown away by the claim would be an understatement, and, honestly, who can blame him?

The report just features the latest of the shocking details that have emerged throughout the 20-plus year investigation into Tupac's untimely death. The performer was gunned down on the Las Vegas Strip following a Mike Tyson fight on Sept. 7, 1996, and would die from his injuries almost a week later at Nevada hospital. Of course, fans speculate to this day that the rapper may actually still be alive. Still, his death sent shockwaves through the hip-hop community as fellow musicians, celebrities, and fans were deeply affected by the loss. The tragedy then continued when the industry lost yet another,iconic figure; the Notorious B.I.G. died in a hail of bullets just months later while in Los Angeles on March 9, 1997 — another senseless killing that, to this day, remains a mystery.

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In his short time on earth, Tupac became known for the prolific subject matter used in his rhymes, as well as his infectious smile and acting abilities. His persona and talent has had a lasting affect on those who became fans of his artistry, whether that happened before or after his death. Though he's been gone for more than two decades, his life's work and presence is still just as evident, if not more wide-spread, than it was during his life.

And, more than 20 years after his death, Tupac continues to effortlessly capture everyone's attention because of the many, many questions that remain unanswered about his murder. With the reported discovery and disappearance of the handgun used to kill him being just the latest emerging detail in the unsolved case, fans can only hope that more information will come forth about his murder. But his massive fan base will continue to keep his legacy alive and well, because, as they all know, though they may get their wings, true legends never die.