What Is DNA Eating? This New Way Of Personalising Your Diet Is Hitting The High Street

Yo!

I'm definitely not the only one who enjoys a bit of personalisation. Whether it's a perfume bottle with my initials on it, or a foundation designed exactly for my skin, I just love it. And it seems as though the beauty industry isn't the only place where highly personalised goods are becoming the norm. A report by YO! Sushi and The Future Laboratory revealed that while 2018 was the year of veganism, 2019 and beyond will see "personalists" hit the world of nutrition, with DNA front and centre. So what is DNA eating and what are its benefits?

Personalists are said to be those who embrace technology and science to track their wellness and use data to feed their nutrition choices. With this in mind, DNA Eating has come to the forefront of food and nutrition. DNA Eating (like neutrigenetics) allows you to optimise your diet around what your DNA and genetic make up suggests your body needs. This method results in a completely bespoke nutritional plan for you.

While the science is fairly underdeveloped and, as Wired reports, experts agree it needs more research, one of the most recognisable restaurant chains in the UK has decided to launch a new initiative based on DNA eating.

VICTOR TORRES/Stocksy

YO! Dinner, YO! Way's DNA Dining is the new concept from Yo! which focuses on designing plates for diners based on their genetic make up. In partnership with DNAFit, the chain is offering its guests a DNA at-home test, which will reveal a breakdown of their unique needs. The test can determine things like lactose intolerance and omega 3 deficiencies, so is designed for health purposes rather than losing weight. Those who take part will then receive a Personalised Plate Plan designed in collaboration by DNAFit dieticians and YO! chefs.

Speaking about the new concept, Avi Lasarow, CEO of DNAFit, commented:

“There is no such thing as a one size fits all approach to diet and nutrition, and it is excellent to see YO! embrace the potential of a DNA-guided menu. We know that personalisation is becoming increasingly important to so many decisions we make each day as consumers, and YO! Dinner, YO! Way will get diners one step closer to living their best possible life.”

That said, while it sounds like a fun concept to get involved with, it's worth remembering that DNA eating is still in the early stages of development. Experts who spoke to Wired tended to agree that you should approach results with caution before entirely restructuring your diet. When I spoke to Professor Eran Segal, a computational biologist at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, about neutrigenetics, he said he had doubts about the merit of this increasingly talked-about science:

"Although our human genome may be important in determining which foods are good for each of us, the science is still not there and thus far there is no evidence that such approaches work."

If you're interested in trying it out the Yo! initiative, you'll have to be quick; there are a limited number of spaces available nationwide. You can sign up at yosushi.com/dnafit to register your interest.