Women Who Use Cannabis Before Sex Might Be Twice As Likely To Have An Orgasm, A New Study Says

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Because the legalization of recreational cannabis in the U.S. is still relatively new and varies by state, there hasn't been a lot of research about some of the lesser-known potential benefits of marijuana. But that could be changing. A new study revealed that women who use cannabis before sex might be more likely to report an orgasm — quite a bit more likely, in fact. Published in the journal Sexual Medicine, the study reported that women who smoked marijuana frequently, regardless of whether or not they smoked before sex, were twice as likely to report satisfactory orgasms. Survey respondents who used cannabis also cited an increase in orgasm intensity, desire, and overall sexual enjoyment.

"The question of how marijuana leads to these positive changes in sexual function is unknown," the study stated. "It may lower sexual inhibitions and increase confidence and a willingness to experiment. Marijuana is also known to heighten sensations such as touch, smell, sight, taste, and hearing."

Though exactly how cannabis affects sexual function is not clear, past research suggests that it interacts with your body's endocannabinoid system, a study published in the journal Pharmacological Reviews explained. This system is made of receptors and neurotransmitters in your brain and central nervous system that respond to cannabinoids and other compounds present in cannabis.

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The study published in Sexual Functioning supported this theory. "It is postulated that marijuana works through a variety of mechanisms. It is recognized that marijuana and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, which controls the sex hormones, interact with each other. There are cannabinoid receptors in the hypothalamus that regulate gonadotrophin-releasing hormone and oxytocin release, both of which play a role in normal sexual functioning. In addition, marijuana has been shown to affect testosterone levels, which play a role in sex drive, but how and in which direction in women is unclear."

What's more, hormones and neurotransmitters, like dopamine and serotonin, affect female sexual functioning, and activation of cannabinoid receptors has been shown to enhance dopamine, the study explained. Increased dopamine levels might lead to more satisfying sex — but not for everyone. While cannabis lowers stress and anxiety and increases pleasure in some people, it has the opposite effect on others. If marijuana makes you anxious or paranoid (raising my hand here), it probably won't do you any favors in the bedroom. However, a survey from Remedy Review reported that CBD (cannabidiol), which, unlike cannabis, does not contain THC, works the same way and increased sexual pleasure in 68 percent of respondents.

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CBD, unlike THC, won't get you high, so it could be a good alternative to cannabis if you're looking to incorporate weed into your sex life. "CBD can lessen feelings of performance anxiety and other insecurities, and lubrication products that include CBD provide added sensation that can make it easier to focus on your body during sex," Melena Gurganus wrote for Remedy Review.

CBD is available in capsules, tinctures, sprays, gummies, lubes, and more. If you want to bring cannabis into the bedroom, but you're not into smoking it, you can opt for edibles. If you've never tried cannabis, less is more until you know how it will affect you.