How To Track Winter Storm Jonas This Weekend, Whether You're In The Thick Of The Snow Storm Or Watching From Afar

Whether you're in the thick of the bad weather or just want to see what's going on on the other side of the country, the Internet has made it easy to stay on top of the blizzard on the East Coast. There are many ways to track winter storm Jonas as the severity of the storm increases. Discussion about the inclement weather has dominated social media. Many are taking to Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook to post their own personal updates as soon as they catch snow falling. Those in the Southeast are similarly expecting severe weather from Jonas, though some states will see thunderstorms and possibly tornadoes instead of the up to 2 feet of snow expected in the most heavily affected sections of the Northeast.

According to live updates from AccuWeather, initial signs of Winter Storm Jonas began promptly at midnight in North Carolina, where sleet had reportedly hit Marion. The storm continued to pummel the Mid-Atlantic with snow and rain. Severe winds in the Deep South were enough to leave thousands without power as conditions began to worsen. Many states are facing state of emergencies, flights are getting canceled, and even sports are getting impacted by the storm. It's unclear whether the severe weather will affect the NFC Championship game between the Carolina Panthers and the Arizona Cardinals, to be held Sunday night in Charlotte. Pass your time and pregame for the storm to come with the best the Internet has to offer.

Jim Cantore

Handout/Getty Images News/Getty Images

Commonly referred to as America's weatherman, meteorologist superstar Jim Cantore is most definitely on the scene of Winter Storm Jonas. He'll be providing coverage for The Weather Channel as always but will keep his ear to the ground and be frequently updating his Twitter and Facebook page as the storm progresses. Cantore typically hosts Weather Center Live when not pursuing major weather events.

WeatherUnderground

WeatherUnderground has assumed the role of one stop shop for all things Winter Storm Jonas-related. The website offers a live blog of storm updates in addition to radar and webcam footage in addition to offering their own app. A severe weather section specifically for storms like these provides a detailed map of the United States as well as warnings broken down by state, so those in California bracing for El Nino can find pertinent information on their severe weather just as fast as someone in Maine wondering how much the blizzard will impact them.

RadarScope

Those still able to leave their houses despite the snow need only fire up RadarScope to stay abreast of weather patterns. The app runs on both iOS and Android and offers up the kind of hyper-specific information that can help you pinpoint everything from developing wind patterns to storm velocity. The app costs $9.99 and ranked among the best for the very purpose of following severe weather.

Social Media

Twitter and Facebook can become incredibly helpful tools when it comes to natural disasters and inclement weather. Mixed in with the more hilarious Winter Storm Jonas memes is accurate, up to the minute information from the likes of local meteorologists and the NOAA as well as on the ground coverage from journalists and local citizens just as fascinated by the snowstorm. BuzzFeedNews has compiled an exhaustive list of Twitter accounts to track wild weather around the country. Many local meteorology buffs and newscasters have similarly done the same thing, with Capital Weather Gang stepping up to the plate for Washington, D.C.

NASA

If you're looking to relax with a live look into the weather transpiring on earth from high above, NASA may be your best bet. Its live feed from the International Space Station feels like slow television, a phenomenon akin to the relaxing burn of a yule log over the holidays. The ISS shots won't guarantee an immediate look at the states, though the footage certainly isn't something to discount. Watching the clouds roll by as the earth rotates is simply spectacular whether a storm is passing through or not.

Images: Getty (2), Screenshot/WeatherUnderground (1), Screenshot/RadarScope (1), NASA.gov/YouTube (1)