What To Bring On Voting Day: A State-By-State Guide On What You Need At The Polls

Preparing to head to the polls on Nov. 8? In light of some unfortunate recent changes to voting regulations, it is important to know what to bring on voting day so you can stand up and be counted. The good news is that in many states, as long as you have registered to vote by the designated cut-off date, all you need to bring is your fabulous self. That's right — you can just show up and sign in at your registered polling place (you don't even need a pen).

As of 2016, a total of 34 of the 50 states either request or require some form of identification. If the elector does not have the required ID, they can often still vote by provisional ballot or sign some form of affidavit swearing to their identity, but it can get a little complicated (and you don't need that hassle when you're trying to exercise your democratic right). For these reasons it is a good idea to bring some form of identification that clearly lists your name and current address. First time voters should either bring photo identification or a piece of mail/pay stub that shows their name and address, even if their state does not require an ID to vote.

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On Nov. 8 voters will be casting ballots for more than just the President. Choosing the legislative body and court justices can have serious implications in the way the country runs in the years to come, so make sure that you know who is on the ballot before heading to the polls. It’s a good idea to bring any material you need to remember how you want to vote.

Another thing to keep in mind is that if you are voting during a high-traffic time and anticipate waiting in-line, you may want to bring coffee, water, and a snack. To avoid extended wait times it’s best to vote between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. (and avoid the lunch rush between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.).

Here is what to bring to the polls, depending on your state:

States Where A Photo ID Required

Indiana voters need to bring a photo ID issued by the state or the US government

Kansas voters need to bring a current photo ID, though people 65 years and older may use an expired ID. Voters can use a government or state issued ID, concealed carry handgun license, or student ID.

Georgia voters need to bring a photo ID issued by Indiana or the US government, or a student ID card from a public university.

Mississippi voters need to bring a current photo ID. Voters can use a government or state issued ID, valid Mississippi license to carry a gun, or student ID.

Tennessee voters need to bring a current photo ID. Voters can use a government or state issued ID, or Tennessee handgun carry permit.

Texas voters need to bring a photo ID, it can be expired for up to four years. Voters can use a government or state issued ID, a handgun carry permit, and a US citizenship certificate containing your photograph. If the voter does not have a photo ID, they can elect to sign a sworn statement that there is a reason why they don't have the adequate ID, and bring another document with name and address such as a utility bill, pay stub, or a certified birth certificate.

Virginia voters need to bring a photo ID issued by the state or the US government, though student photo IDs from universities located in the state, and employee IDs are also accepted.

Wisconsin voters need to bring a photo ID. Voters can use a government or state issued ID or driver's license that expired after Nov. 4, 2014, or student ID (with a separate document that proves enrollment).

New Hampshire voters need to bring a photo ID to the polls. Any ID card issued by the state or the US government or a student ID is accepted. If the voter doesn't have one of these forms of identification they can elect to have their identity verified by a voting official or have their picture taken at the polling location, or sign a "challenged voter affidavit" and follow its steps.

Idaho voters need to bring a photo ID to the polls. Any photo ID card issued by the state or the US government or a current student ID is accepted. If the voter doesn't have this identification, they must sign a statement swearing to their identity at the voting location.

South Dakota voters need to bring a photo ID to the polls. Any photo ID card issued by the state or the US government or a current student ID is accepted. If the voter doesn't have this identification, they must sign a statement swearing to their identity at the voting location.

Louisiana voters need to bring a photo ID to the polls. Any photo ID card issued by the state or the US government or any picture ID with the voter's name and signature. If the voter doesn't have this identification they can fill out a sworn statement with their date of birth and mother's maiden name.

Alabama voters need to bring a photo ID to the polls. Any photo ID card issued by the state or the US government or a current student ID is accepted.

Florida voters need to bring a form of identification that clearly shows their photo and signature (License to carry a concealed weapon or firearm, as well as student or employee Ids are accepted).

Michigan voters need to bring a photo ID to the polls. Any photo ID card that is issued by the state or the US government or generally recognized is accepted. If the voter does not have this identification they can sign a sworn statement confirming their identity.

Rhode Island voters need to bring a photo ID to the polls. Any photo ID card issued by the state or the US government or a current student ID, military ID, etc. is accepted.

Hawaii requires a photo ID with a signature to be presented at the polling station.

Washington requires a form of photo ID to be presented in person, whether it is government issued, or a student or employee ID card. If the elector is without identification, they can vote by provisional ballot.

States Where A Non-Photo ID Is Required

Arizona requires a photo ID with the voter's name and address, or two forms of non-photo identification (that lists name and address as well).

Ohio requires some form of identification with the voter's name and address to be presented at the polling place. It can be anything from a government document, driver's license, bank statement, or paycheck.

North Dakota voters must bring either a ND Driver’s license, ND non-driver’s license ID, or Tribal ID. If they do not have identification they must sign a statement confirming their identity.

Oklahoma voters must present a form of photo ID or voter registration card when signing in at the polling place. If they do not have their identification, they can vote on a provisional ballot.

Kentucky requires voters to present a form of government issued ID, any ID with photo and signature, or social security card. If they do not have identification they must sign a statement confirming their identity and qualifications.

Colorado requires voters to present a form of government issued ID, any ID with photo and signature, or anything with name and address such as a government document, driver's license, bank statement, or paycheck. Without ID the elector can cast a provisional ballot.

Connecticut requires voters to present a social security card or some form of ID with their name, and either address, signature, or photo.

Montana requires some form of identification with the voter's name and address to be presented at the polling place. It can be anything from a government document, driver's license, bank statement, student photo ID, or paycheck.

Alaska requires some form of identification with the voter's name and address to be presented. It can be anything form of government document including a hunting or fishing license, driver's license, bank statement, student photo ID, or paycheck.

States Where ID Is Not Required

California, Nevada, Oregon, Wyoming, New Mexico, Nebraska, Iowa, Minnesota, Illinois, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, New York, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Vermont, and Maine.

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