Is Nevada Winner Take-All On Election Day? Here's How This Swing State Could Affect The Election

SPARKS, NV - NOVEMBER 6: An electronic voting card and vote stickers are seen at a polling place November 6, 2012 in Sparks, Nevada. As Americans go to vote, President Barack Obama and Republican nominee former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney remain in a virtual tie in the national polls. (Photo by Max Whittaker/Getty Images)
Source: Max Whittaker/Getty Images News/Getty Images

Because America likes to throw an extra twist into our presidential elections, it's not enough for us to just tally up the popular vote — we have to throw this electoral college into the mix, including some states that divide their votes and some states that don't. So, considering that Nevada might prove to be an important state tonight, is Nevada a winner-take-all state on election day? Interestingly, the state is different in the general election than in the Democratic primary. 

In the primary season, Nevada splits its pledged delegates among the different candidates. In the general election, however, Nevada is a winner-take-all state. Whoever wins the popular vote will take Nevada's six electoral votes, no matter how close the vote is. 

Most states in the U.S. are also winner-take-all in the general election, but there are two exceptions — Nebraska and Main — which divide their electoral votes based on districts, instead of awarding all electoral votes to the overall winner in the state. However, Nevada, like most other states, is winner-take-all. 

And that could be important tonight, given how many states are in play in this election. Although Nevada isn't the biggest state in the country — and certainly isn't the swing state that everyone is watching most closely — in a close election, every vote counts. And if it does come down to Nevada, the winner will walk away with all six votes. 


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