Where Will Donald Trump Live Before Moving Into The White House? His Penthouse Is Hard To Bid Goodbye To

President-elect Donald Trump took a tour of the White House last week, meeting with President Obama to talk about the upcoming transition. On the level of policy they might not have agreed on much (or will ever agree on much), but one thing they will share is the experience of residing in the White House. News reports say that Trump "marveled at the neoclassical architecture and history." But in the meantime, where will Trump live before moving into the White House? He will almost surely stay in his New York penthouse when he's not vacationing at his other properties until he moves in on June 20.

The question is if he will truly move in. In fact, he may continue returning to the Trump Tower penthouse; his golf course in Bedminster, New Jersey; or the Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida, on the weekends even when he is in the White House — much like other senators and representatives do. The New York Times covered his coming move Friday and how difficult it will be for the president-elect to leave his home of 30 years.

After all, he decorated, designed, and built it himself on the 58th floor of Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue (complete with the gold-gilding and marble and that you've read read about or seen detailed in spreads like this one). The sheer opulence is outrageous, and somewhat like the West Wing of the White House, he has an office just nearby in the form of a direct elevator that takes hims to the Trump offices on the 26th floor with no stops.

A bit of redecorating might make it feel more homey — or more regal, as he is actually more accustomed. Kate Andersen Brower, author of First Women: The Grace and Power of America's Modern First Ladies told ABC News that while some of the White House is off limits for a remodel — the second and third floors, where the First Family lives would be redecorated. "The first lady will collaborate with an interior designer of her choice," ABC News reported.

In the end, he surely will take residence — after all, you kind of have to if you're going to be president. "Yes, I would live in the White House because it's the appropriate thing to do," he said last year, The Hill reported. Even vacations would potentially be off the table: "I would work. And I would make the country great again. That's what you have to do."