'Mean Girls' Jonathan Bennett Reveals Where the Burn Book Is Currently Hiding

His hair still looks sexy pushed back... at least, that's what hoards of Mean Girls fans tell Jonathan Bennett on the daily. Bennett, who played Cady's secret crush Aaron Samuels in the 2004 film, was interviewed by People about his latest gig as the host of MTV's karaoke competition show, Copycat and the conversation inevitably wound up drifting into Mean Girls territory. Bennett's cool with being known for his role in the insanely popular teen movie (despite the fact that people comment on his hair so often that it's now a part of his Twitter bio) but he does have something to say about how Mean Girls would fare in 2014. Though so much of Mean Girls rings true in 2014, not everything stands the test of time. According to Bennett, a 2014 Mean Girls wouldn't need a Burn Book — Regina would have just taken to Twitter.

Even though Mean Girls is the top tweeted film, when we made that movie, Facebook and Twitter didn't exist. Now we have a giant "burn book": Twitter.

It's crazy to think that when Mean Girls came out Twitter wasn't even a thing, let alone popular. Had it existed, the movie would be really different... and probably shorter. People are pretty much the way they are no matter what decade you live in, but I certainly would not want to live in a world where Regina George had the ability to ruin your life via the Internet. (Scariest. Thing. Ever.)

Seriously. Mean Girls with social media would elevate this teen comedy into a full-blown horror film... or at least a really, really scary Lifetime movie. The Burn Book allowed the Plastics to talk trash about the people at their high school anonymously, which sent the entire school into a frenzy over who was saying what about whom. You don't have to imagine what that situation would be like today — just read about this Connecticut high school's experience with the anonymous gossip app, YikYak and you'll see exactly what a digital Burn Book would look like. It's way scarier than any backhanded compliment from the Queen of the Plastics.

Mean Girls may be the best movie of our generation but we can't forget that the movie is essentially about bullying — and the Internet has taken bullying to a whole new dangerous level.

As Bennett said, we now have more tools than ever to make other people's lives hard. And, yeah, Regina and the Plastics would have totally used social media to their advantage had they had the ability to use it. But Mean Girls isn't just a great comedy — it also teaches us valuable lessons about being kind to others and staying true to one's self. In a world where bullying has become easier to do — and to become a victim of — we might all need to take a little bit of advice from Kevin G.

Thanks, Kev.

Images: Celebuzz