M. Night Shyamalan Wrote 'She's All That.' Here are 9 Reasons It Should've Been Obvious

So M. Night Shyamalan ghost-wrote She's All That. I know exactly what you're thinking right now:

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But, apparently, it's true. In an interview with Movies.com, the After Earth director said he wrote the film the same year his break-out, The Sixth Sensewas released. When asked about his patented twist formula, the director said, "You're saying the audience's relationship started with me with The Sixth Sense. That same year I wrote Stuart Little. I ghost-wrote a movie that same year that would even add to the breadth of it all. I ghost-wrote the movie She's All That."

The revelation might seem more shocking than, well, any Shyamalan movie, but is it really? Here are nine reasons it should have been obvious the director penned the '90s rom-com hit. 

Shocking Twists

 

Wait, wait, wait — she's pretty without glasses?!

Otherworldly Events

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Forget aliens and nefarious trees. For M. Night's next movie, I hope he explores how an entire high school managed to deliver an impressively choreographed number to "Rockafeller Skank" with seemingly little practice. (After all, between scheming and social studies, when would they have time to practice something this professional?) Suddenly, my high school's group performance of "Macarena" seems much less impressive. 

Surprising Cameos

 

Remember when M. Night played himself in Signs and Lady In the Water? Slightly less surprising (but more embarrassing) a cameo than when Usher played a DJ in She's All That

Terrible Dialogue

 

"I feel like Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman. You know, except for the whole hooker thing."

Unintentional Hilarity

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And you thought there was nothing lamer than a hacky sack. 

A Manic Pixie Dream Girl

 

Laney Boggs predates The Happening's plucky but irritating Alma Moore (Zooey Deschanel) by a whopping eight years. 

...Who Is Also the Lady in the Water

 

 

I mean, come on. 

The Mere Presence of a Culkin

 

Though Kieran Culkin starred as Laney's younger brother in She's All That, three years later, M. Night was forced to settle for the lesser Culkin, Rory, in Signs.

 

It's Just So '90s

 

And so is M. Night. In fact, we feel about him the same way we feel about Brock Hudson's The Real World: Nostalgic, but wondering why we were ever captivated by it in the first place?

Images: Miramax; Touchstone Pictures; Legendary Pictures

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