The Victoria's Secret Angels Aren't Hot In Person, According To Journalist Seth Stevenson — He Made Some Comments That Would Sting Even For A Supermodel

"Victoria's Secret Angels aren't actually very attractive," said no one ever. Well, until now. Seth Stevenson penned an editorial for Fashionista about his experience traveling to London to cover this year's Victoria's Secret Fashion Show, and his thoughts are frankly appalling. Yes, men have their "types" when it comes to women, and everyone's entitled to his or her opinion, but his comments about how the Victoria's Secret models look up close are kind of disgusting.

"Many models, up close, are not actually hot," he says. OK, fair enough. Agree to disagree, as the editor of the piece noted. "In person, a lot of the VS models were more freakish than sexy... Their limbs were like toothpicks, seemingly in danger of snapping at any given moment. They moved like gangly baby horses that were too leggy for their own bodies." Now that's just rude. Think what you want about the appearance of the Victoria's Secret models, but that description is unnecessarily harsh. Supermodels or not, that's a pretty hurtful thing to say.

He also said, "I am an average-sized fellow, so they all loomed over me in an intimidating fashion." So tall girls are kind of scary now? Keep digging a ditch, Stevenson.

Icing on the cake: "And while some of these ladies indeed had lovely faces," so far so good... "many among them had mugs of such extreme angles and proportions that they ceased to be attractive — cheekbones cantilevering so far afield that they almost seemed like face-wings. I shudder picturing it now." Almost had it.

What is it with our culture of put-downs and negativity? These women are known as having some of the most fit bodies and beautiful faces in the world, and even they don't get a free pass, apparently.

I was pretty bummed out when I read his piece, because it just shows how far we have to go when it comes to accepting other people and seeing their best aspects, not their so-called flaws. And people like Seth Stevenson aren't helping.

Image: Giphy.com