'Harry Potter' Spinoff 'Fantastic Beasts' May Not Be the Only One — 15 Other Potterverse Books That Deserve Movies, Too

When J.K. Rowling announced that she was writing a screenplay based on the Harry Potter textbook Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, fans thought it couldn't get any better. Then came the news that Warner Bros., who has produced all of the Harry Potter films, trademarked some other titles, hinting towards at least two other Potter-universe films, and our eyes got even wider.

One of the titles trademarked by the studio was The Tales of Beedle the Bard, a book of wizard fairytales that played a major role in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows and was later written and published by Rowling. Warner Bros. also trademarked a whole slew of terms relating to Quidditch Through the Ages, including the title, the author's name, and the names of quidditch teams like Ron Weasley's favorite, the Chudley Cannons.

This all hints that there is a very good possibility that Warner Bros. plans on making more films set within the Harry Potter universe, and these books are a good start. But what about all of the others? Tons of books have been mentioned throughout the Harry Potter series, and some even were heavily involved in the plot. Rowling is such a good writer that even the books in her books would make amazing movies.

To give the producers over at Warner Bros. some help, here are some of Harry Potter series' most memorable books ranked from worst film potential to best.

Images: Warner Brothers

Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images News/Getty Images

When J.K. Rowling announced that she was writing a screenplay based on the Harry Potter textbook Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, fans thought it couldn't get any better. Then came the news that Warner Bros., who has produced all of the Harry Potter films, trademarked some other titles, hinting towards at least two other Potter-universe films, and our eyes got even wider.

One of the titles trademarked by the studio was The Tales of Beedle the Bard, a book of wizard fairytales that played a major role in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows and was later written and published by Rowling. Warner Bros. also trademarked a whole slew of terms relating to Quidditch Through the Ages, including the title, the author's name, and the names of quidditch teams like Ron Weasley's favorite, the Chudley Cannons.

This all hints that there is a very good possibility that Warner Bros. plans on making more films set within the Harry Potter universe, and these books are a good start. But what about all of the others? Tons of books have been mentioned throughout the Harry Potter series, and some even were heavily involved in the plot. Rowling is such a good writer that even the books in her books would make amazing movies.

To give the producers over at Warner Bros. some help, here are some of Harry Potter series' most memorable books ranked from worst film potential to best.

Images: Warner Brothers

15.'The Standard Book of Spells' (Grades 1-7), Miranda Goshawk

Sure, Goshawk's series of charms textbooks taught Hogwarts students all of the basics, but that doesn't mean it'd be fun to watch. Wingardium Leviosa, Alohomora, Accio—they're things every wizard learns at age 11. It'd be like watching a movie about the multiplication tables.

14'Home Life and Social Habits of British Muggles,' Wilhelm Wigworthy

Technically, isn't every British movie that's not Harry Potter actually Home Life and Social Habits of British Muggles? This textbook for Hogwarts' Muggle Studies class is something that really only appeals to people like Arthur Weasley, whose greatest ambition in life is to understand how airplanes stay up.

13'One Thousand Magical Herbs and Fungi,' Phyllida Spore

Similar to The Standard Book of Spells, this one's pretty basic. It details all of the different plants, herbs, fungi, roots, etc. available in the wizarding world. It only beats the spell book because there are some pretty hardcore plants out there that can cause serious harm or give you temporary gills. Plus, this hypothetical movie could have a separate plot that follows Neville Longbottom as he becomes a herbology professor, and the world needs more Neville.

12Rita Skeeter's Articles

No, not a single scene of the adaptation of one of Skeeter's stories would be factual within the Potter-verse, but they would be really entertaining. They'd be like feature-length soap operas, or very cheesy melodramas. Really any article would suffice, as long as it was written by Skeeter and her trusty Quick-Quotes Quill. The only stories off-limits? Any of her books. The Life and Lies of Albus Dumbledore, Snape: Scoundrel or Saint?, whatever she wrote about Harry—Potterheads won't support that garbage.

11Gilderoy Lockhart's Books

While Arthur Weasley might enjoy a film about muggles, his wife Molly would definitely prefer one based on any of Lockhart's books. Lockhart is quite the heartthrob in the wizard community — he is a five-time winner of Witch Weekly's Most-Charming-Smile Award, after all. His books have catchy titles, Voyages with Vampires, Break with a Banshee, Travels with Trolls and of course, we can't forget his autobiography, Magical Me.

But rather than a classic heroic film about a good-looking guy saving innocent people form monsters, a more honest movie could be an awesomely dark look at a con artist who uses his charms (both natural and magical) to take credit for other people's achievements. The twist ending will be hard to forget —for everyone but Lockhart himself.

10'Twelve Fail-Safe Ways to Charm Witches'

The relationship guide that helped Ron finally start to really pursue Hermione would make a cute little romantic comedy. It could be done in the style of He's Just Not That Into You, but better, with intersecting story lines of wizards trying to get a date with their own Hermiones. Perhaps there could even be a nice little after-the-credits scene of Hermione and Ron telling their kids about some of Ron's efforts to win her before the Battle of Hogwarts.

9'Advanced Potion-Making,' Libatius Borage

Here the movie potential lies not necessarily in the book, but how it affected the story of Harry Potter. Harry had a few potions textbooks over the years, but Advanced Potion-Making was the one made infamous in The Half-Blood Prince, when he has a copy covered in notes by a potions prodigy who turns out to be Snape.

Snape has a very interesting, heartbreaking backstory, and a movie about his past and where his talent for potions comes from would be very appealing to all of his fans out there. Maybe we could learn a little more about Professor Slughorn too, and if he made any other major mistakes with students besides giving Voldemort deadly information.

8'A Beginner's Guide to Transfiguration,' Emeric Switch

Transfiguration is definitely one of the coolest types of magic we get to see in Harry Potter. Turning rats into tea cups, people into animals, it's all impressive to watch. Imagine the story of the guy who first discovered how transfiguration works, there's so much material for an exciting movie.

Just like Advanced Potion-Making could be improved by a professor tie-in, Transfiguration should feature Hogwarts' transfiguration professor/resident badass Minerva McGonagall. As we learned on Pottermore, she has quite a history that didn't make it into the series.

7'The Tales of Beedle the Bard'

Warner Bros. might already be thinking about making a Tales of Beedle the Bard film, but it's going to be tough. The book is a collection of fairy tales and folklore for wizards, how could a movie show them? It could be a franchise, where the most exciting tales get their own films. Or a series of shorter films, some even animated. If they want a single movie, there could always be a framing device of a narrator somewhere telling the stories.

The Tale of the Three Brothers stood out in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows for its unique animation (watch the full sequence here), but the story also had truth to it. The best way to adapt the anthology could be to show the inspiration behind each tale, and how it was transformed into a children's story, with the two versions contrasted visually.

6'A History of Magic,' Bathilda Bagshot

It's unfortunate that Rowling only published real-world versions of Beedle the Bard, Quidditch Through the Ages and Fantastic Beasts when so many other books from Harry Potter are just as intriguing. A History of Magic could be really interesting and make a great movie, or it could be extremely boring. One movie isn't long enough to cover the entire history, but the earliest records of magic would probably serve for the best story. Besides the fact that Merlin was somehow involved in the old days, we don't know much else.

The author, Bathilda Bagshot, could make for a great story as well. She lived in Godric's Hollow, the small wizard neighborhood where Dumbledore grew up and Harry lived until his parents were killed. Oh, and her nephew became a dark wizard only second in his power to Voldemort, who had a relationship with Dumbledore when they were teenagers. Yeah, I think Warner Bros. can work with this.

5'Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them,' Newt Scamander

It makes sense why Rowling chose this to be her first spin-off. The book had already been written for fans, it was filled with imaginative creatures bound to pull in audiences and it introduced a new character who could bring a whole new dimension to what we know about the wizarding world. Still, it isn't my first choice for a movie. I'm excited for it, and I think it'll be great—especially that we'll get to see not only our first American wizards, but wizards in New York. I'm just saying, there are some other books with even more potential.

4'The Monster Book of Monsters,' Edwardus Lima

I'm sure Newt Scamander is a talented Magizoologist and everything, but I'm more interested in the guy who's book has fangs and will bite anyone who tries to touch it. Only Hagrid was brave enough to assign this book for Care of Magical Creatures, and if Lima has Hagrid's respect, he has mine. Maybe the sequel to Fantastic Beasts can follow Lima, who picked up where Scamander left off, but with even more dangerous beasts.

3'Secrets of the Darkest Art,' Owle Bullock & 'Practical Defensive Magic and Its Use Against the Dark Arts'

These two books are technically complete opposites, but if combined, would make a great movie. Secrets of the Darkest Art is a book that discusses the dark side of magic, and taught Voldemort how to make horcruxes, resulting in it being banned from Hogwarts. Then Hermione found and used the book to learn about horcruxes too, but to help destroy them. Practical Defensive Magic, on the other hand, teaches how to defend yourself against dark magic. It was given to Harry by Remus Lupin and Sirius Black and he used it to teach Dumbledore's Army, so you know it's legit.

Imagine a movie that follows one wizard unlocking all of the secrets of dark magic, and another learning how to stop him. They'll meet in the end for a battle that tests who is stronger. How great would that be?! I'd go to the midnight premiere.

2'Quidditch Through the Ages,' Kennilworthy Whisp

If this really is going to be a movie, you should be excited. Quidditch is a really fun, strange sport with a long history. Think about all of the classic sports movies out there, Remember the Titans, A League of Their Own, Field of Dreams, Rudy. Now add magic. Source material doesn't get much better. There's so much the movie could focus on, the development of the sport in general, changes to the game, historic matches, groundbreaking players and much more. If quidditch is popular enough to have a real-world version, you can bet the movie about it would be insanely successful.

1'Hogwarts: A History'

If Hogwarts: A History was ever made into a film, it would be the best movie of all time. It would surpass every other Harry Potter movie and become a worldwide hit. Hogwarts: A History was meant to be a movie, if not an entire franchise. From what we knew about Hogwarts and its founders, there are hours of stories to tell.

The four founders, Godric Gryffindor, Helga Hufflepuff, Rowena Ravenclaw and Salazar Slytherin, each have their own unique backgrounds, beliefs and ideas on how a school should be governed. There's enough material for each founder to have their own film, followed by another film or two (or nine) that unites them at the school.

Then there's the school itself, which has seen the growth and education of thousands of wizards, and has hundreds of rooms with unique purposes, some of which we've never even seen. Don't forget about the professors either, each has a past and story to tell. The same goes for the ghosts, and Peeves, and Filch and even Mrs. Norris.

Please, J.K. Rowling, Warner Bros., the spirit of Dumbledore, whoever can help, make this happen. Hogwarts: A History is a book that has never technically been written, but can inspire a rich, enthralling, dramatic, action-packed movie, the likes of which has never been seen in the muggle world.