World's Largest Snake Was Just Found Dead And You Need To See It — VIDEO

A deadly Australia eastern brown snake -- which has enough venom to kill 20 adults with a single bite -- is photographed in the Sydney suburb of Terrey Hills on September 25, 2012., in the Sydney on October 3, 2012. Australia is home to 20 of the world's 25 most venomous snakes, including the entire top 10, from which a single scratch from a venom-coated tooth can be enough to paralyse the heart, diaphragm and lungs. Several species are found in urban areas along the populous east coast. According to official estimates there are about 3,000 snake bites in Australia every year, 300-500 of which will receive anti-venom treatment. An average of two will prove fatal. AFP PHOTO/William WEST (Photo credit should read WILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images)
Source: WILLIAM WEST/AFP/Getty Images
Possibly you navigated to this page to seize your nightmares by the horns, to really take control of your phobias. Or maybe you’re a person who genuinely needs to see the world’s largest snake in its most lifeless form. Either way, you’re here now. And what better way to utilize this rare opportunity to scare yourself half to death than to season it with a plethora of other terrifying visual imagery? Because you know what you and I and every other human have in common? Unfounded and inexplicable fears of creatures big and small. (No seriously, the noise that escapes my mouth at the sight of a spider is bone-chilling.)

Nearly 10 percent of people develop phobias, those over-the-top irrational fears of things like clowns and critters, and there’s evidence to suggest that some may be genetic. Insects, spiders, and snakes top the list of things that folks report are most frequently responsible for their irrational fears, with heights and tight spaces trailing close behind. (Or, if you’re Channing Tatum, porcelain dolls are the perpetrators of your waking nightmares.)

But why, specifically? In the instance of snakes, science suggests we’re programmed that way: “[T]he brain evolved to pay greater attention to the presence of snakes than other creatures, because snakes were among the earliest human predators and posed a daily threat,” reports the Wall Street Journal. But as a specialist at the Smithsonian points out, phobias can be combated with gradual, controlled exposure to the thing that haunts you. So consider this a little free therapy from your friends here at Bustle.
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See? Not all that bad; just a rapid heart rate, increased alertness, and sweaty palms is all. Let’s keep a good thing going, shall we? Below, three more videos for your nightmare fuel. (I'll skip the spiders though because I'm not a sadist.)

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"He's really angry."

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Here's an animal you didn't even know to fear until just now. You're very welcome.

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NOPE.

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