How To Describe A Haircut To Your Stylist, So You Can Get The Exact 'Do You Want This Season

Sometimes, no matter how long we've been with our hairstylist, figuring out how to describe the haircut you want can be almost impossible. Of course, the best way to get exactly what you want is to bring in a bunch of photos — but who has access to a printer these days?! Just in case you're getting a drastic, new haircut or color this spring, I asked hair stylist Edward Tricomi and master colorist Joel Warren, co-founders (along with "business guru Roxana Pintilie") of Warren Tricomi Salon, to give some tips on how to communicate popular celebrity 'dos to your stylist.

Personally, I will take any excuse to get a drastic haircut. The warmer weather and all-around happier spring season seems like a good reason to me. Unfortunately, I have also been subject to many terrible haircuts simply because my lack of hairstyling knowledge. It's no one's fault, really. Hairstylists went to school where they were taught a hair-language I was never privy to learn.

This lack of universal hair-language has been the cause for many unnecessary, tear-inducing haircuts. I believe my hair-induced heartache could have been avoided if I knew how to explain the what I wanted better. Thankfully, Tricomi and Warren put a few popular hairstyles in basic terms, so no more hair-induced tears.

1. Wispy Bangs, Like Reese

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Tricomi says to ask your stylist to "bring the hair to the bridge of the nose and when you cut the bangs, cut them slightly wispy going straight across."

2. A Pixie Cut, Like Lena

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To get this exact length, tell your stylist to "cut short and spiky over the ears," Tricomi says.

3. A Longer Pixie, Like Lily's

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Instead of going super short all over, Tricomi advises that "this look should be cut shorter in the back, longer in the front (to the mouth line), then layered."

4. Long Layers, Like JLo

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If you want this classic, flowing 'do, Tricomi says to ask for "long layers from the front down" with very few layers in the back.

5. A Lob, Like Ellie's

Tricomi: Frame the hair from the chin down and then cut it square. No layers.

6. Blunt Bangs, Like Tyra's

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For this striking style, you'll want to ask your stylist to "cut straight across without any layers," Tricomi says.

7. Above The Shoulder, Like Solange

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Women with naturally curly hair should avoid layers, as it can make your strands look boxy.

8. Sideswept Bangs, Like Taylor's

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The best part of these bangs is being able to get trims far less often than with most fringe styles. "These look best slightly grown out," Tricomi says.

9. A Middle Part, Like Vanessa's

This is a basic bob, so just ask your stylist for tips on how to style the perfect middle part.

10. An Edgy Pixie, Like Miley

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It's important you ask for a "disconnected haircut," says Tricomi. "Short buzzed on the side, but long and overlayed on top."

11. Choppy, Wavy, Mermaid Hair, Like Blake

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To get a wash-n-go style like Lively's ask for an "angle cut with very few layers."

12. A Perfect Lob, Like Julianne's

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To nail Hough's signature 'do, ask for "slight layers" and a "slight angle," Tricomi advises.

Now, let's talk color!

13. Blonde Ombre, Like Lauren

"First you have to talk about the base color," says Warren. "In this picture, her color is about a level 7 and lightened more at the ends than at the roots." You'll want to ask for a balayage highlight, which gives that nice, blended effect.

14. Flawless Red, Like Emma

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In order to get a faux ginger that looks au naturel, you'll want to "create a red head that has dimension," Warren says. "Pick out the tonology of the red. This is a titian with highlights woven in." Rather than your typical blonde, you'll want to ask for high or low lights that match your base color.

Images: Getty Images