TV & Movies

Why Carla From Love Fraud Retired From Bounty Hunting After The Show

She's facing her toughest battle yet.

Alex Takats for Showtime

Arguably the most fascinating figure in an already fascinating story is Carla Campbell, the bounty hunter on Love Fraud who agrees to help a group of women looking to take down the man who conned them. She's older, with long gray hair and rimless Silhouette glasses, but don't let her appearance fool you. Carla means business, and you don't want to be on her bad side.

Unlike the rest of the women on Love Fraud, Campbell was not conned out of money by Richard Scott Smith. But she was abused by men in the past, and she's made it her mission in life to avenge other women who've endured the same. That — along with her wealth of tracking experience and investigative chops — made the Kansas-based bounty hunter a natural fit to help the united victims of Smith in their quest to bring their former lover to justice. In fact, she was so angered by what Smith did to them, she took on their case pro bono.

Love Fraud isn't meant to be about Campbell, but she is, in many ways, the engine of the show. "I don’t know if we’re going to do a Love Fraud Season 2 — we haven’t ruled it out if there’s a big story that comes our way," series co-creator Rachel Grady told Vanity Fair. "But we would need to replicate Carla Campbell as an animatron that we can send out to every state."

However, Campbell's involvement in a potential second season could prove tricky, as she retired from bounty hunting upon receiving a Stage 4 metastasized lung cancer diagnosis shortly after completing filming. She's since set up a GoFundMe to raise funds for her medical bills, which you can donate to here.

Despite her health issues, however, Campbell remains committed to tracking down Smith. "Before all of this new stuff [with Smith] started coming up, I was just sitting here going, 'Well, I hope this is what the end of life is not like, because I will enjoy my deck, but really I need something to do.' Rick gave me purpose," Campbell told O magazine. "There is more to come. He's not done."