American Girl Is Hiring A Historical Researcher If You’re Interested In Fulfilling All Your Childhood Dreams

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If you needed a sign to chase the dreams of your 10-year-old self, ding dong, hello, this is your sign: You can now apply to work at American Girl as a historical researcher. Yes, that means you could get paid actual human money to work with American Girl dolls. Did your heart just flutter to the beat of the Saved By The Bell theme song? Same.

The role involves “ensuring authenticity” of the American Girl characters, which I’d like to imagine entails taste-testing civil war era snacks and trying on period-specific attire. Here’s an excerpt from the posting on the American Historical Association’s website:

Job qualifications include having a Bachelor’s degree or higher in History or a related field like American Studies or Material Culture. Experience writing historical nonfiction is also a plus. The job is based in Wisconsin, though — American Girl's headquarters are in Middleton — so bear that in mind if you want to apply.

The listing doesn’t specify which doll they prefer to be your favorite, but it’s probably Samantha.

If nostalgia weren’t enough of a sell, American Girl has been doing work to become more inclusive with their doll lineup. You likely saw stories about American Girl’s first boy doll, Logan Everett, which was added to the collection in February. If you haven’t met Logan, he’s a drummer who plays in a band with Tenney Grant, another new American Girl doll. He’s got grey eyes, wears a plaid shirt, and will grow up to be the musician ex-boyfriend everyone has at least one of.

In addition to Logan and Tenney, more new American Girl Dolls are coming this year. Z Yang, an “imaginative filmmaker who develops her own take on the world around her,” and Nanea Mitchell, a girl from Hawaii “who does her part to help and heal during wartime” are two new additions to look forward to. These dolls with more diverse storylines will join Gabriella, the doll the company named Girl of the Year for 2017. Gabriella, one of the company's newest black dolls, is an artist “out to inspire real change." Additionally, Melody, a girl from Civil Rights-era Detroit, joined the BeForever historical line in 2016.

If American Girl's mission of "inspiring the wonder of childhood" speaks to you or you want to be one step closer to adding a doll-sized version of yourself to the permanent lineup, you can apply for the researcher position here.