How Rich Is David From 'The Bachelorette'? The Chicken Suit Contestant Is Bringing Home The Big Bawks

As the long-awaited season premiere of Becca Kufrin's season of The Bachelorette nears, dedicated fans are studying up, learning everything they can about each of the 28 men that could end up asking for Becca's hand in marriage. Of course, one of the things everyone wants to know is what these guys do for a living, as the show is known to feature a few each season with some — err —interesting titles, to say the least. While this season does have its fair share of men who have chosen some bizarre career endeavors (read: colognoisseur and social media participant), there is one guy who's worth noting, not because of the rarity of his job, but because it, uh, brings home the big bucks. Yes, the guy in the chicken suit, David from The Bachelorette owns a private equity firm. In other words, to put it bluntly, Bachelorette contestant David is rich.

His official bio on ABC's website calls him a "successful businessman" and "venture capitalist," but he confirmed in a video interview with Ashley I. for Access that he does run a private equity firm. "So you run it," Ashley asked him after he told her what he does for a living. "Hence why you can get the three months off?" she asked, referring to the time he would've had to take off to film the show. It's pretty likely that his wallet didn't take much damage during his Bachelorette hiatus.

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To people who have little knowledge of finance industry jargon, his slew of vague titles might have little meaning, and to be fair, all of it can be kind of confusing. So, if you have to know one thing about the private equity business, it's that there is a lot of money in it. A lot. Why is that? Well, private equity firms "gather up funds from wealthy individuals or institutions for the purpose of buying up companies and turning a profit," according to NPR. "The equity firm's managers get fees, as well as about 20 percent of the gross profits." Friendly reminder that yes, David is one of those said managers. Cha-ching.

So essentially, these firms purchase struggling companies, give them an extreme makeover, business-edition, and resell them in the public market for a profit, usually to a large corporation. Of course, a business with money in it like this one can't fly high without consequence. There's a lot of controversy attached to it, especially because a lot of times, their transformations include laying off workers.

On the other hand, venture capitalism is a part of the private equity business in which firms invest in start-up companies and support them as they grow. Because David calls himself a venture capitalist, it can be assumed that he does more of this type of investing rather than the former. However, due to the little information that's available on his specific firm, that cannot be confirmed.

According to the New York Times, the venture capitalist industry has grown immensely, drawing investors from outside the finance world, including journalists, lawyers, and entrepreneurs. Why? Because "a general partner at a top-tier firm typically earns at least $1 million in salary." Another Times article reported the average salary among eight top-ranking private equity executives to be over $211 million. Yes, that number represents the highest of the high-ranking execs, but, with that number being at the top, it's safe to say that owners of smaller firms are doing just fine.

Again, where the University of Georgia grad-turned-Bachelorette contestant falls on this spectrum is unclear, but if he ends up retiring at a young age, you'll know why.

He now resides in Denver, and by the looks of his Instagram, he lives for a good adrenaline rush — not to mention, it's obvious he can afford plenty of them. He's been skydiving at least twice, attended Super Bowl 53, and has done lots of traveling, skiing, and golfing.

He might be rolling in the dough now, but Becca, being as down-to-earth as she is, isn't likely to fall for the cash prize, so here's to hoping he has more than just money up his sleeve.