Trump Tweeted “Not In The U.S.A.” After The NYC Attack & People Think It's Ironic

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After a truck killed eight people near the World Trade Center in what is now being considered a terrorist attack, Trump promptly reacted on Twitter. Yes, he sent his "thoughts, condolences and prayers" to the victims and their families, but he also made a controversial comment that's making a lot of Twitter users angry. After the New York City attack, Trump tweeted "NOT IN THE U.S.A," which comes across as ironic considering his responses to attacks committed by white men.

On Tuesday, he tweeted:  

To many people, his "not in the U.S.A" comment reads as another piece of anti-Muslim rhetoric when put into context. When a white man carried out a mass murder from a hotel room on Oct. 1, killing 58 people, Trump also offered his thoughts and prayers, but didn't say much about gun control. And he certainly didn't proclaim "not in the U.S.A." Instead, he said, "What happened is, in many ways, a miracle."

And after a counter-protestor was hit by a car and killed during a white supremacist protest, Trump blamed "both sides" for the deadly violence. But now that the NYC attacker isn't a white American, Trump seems more fired up than ever. And if the responses on Twitter say anything, New Yorkers aren't fooled by the double standard.

When Trump Gets Upset

Trump's response to this attack is pointedly different from his response to attacks committed by Americans or white supremacists for that matter.

Muslim Ban

Trump has used terrorist attacks to push for the Muslim ban in the past. For example, after a terrorist attack in London happened in September, Trump tweeted, "The travel ban into the United States should be far larger, tougher and more specific – but stupidly, that would not be politically correct!” And he might do it again.

What  About Las Vegas?

On Tuesday, in fact, a bipartisan group of Congress members proposed legislation to ban bump stocks, which can make semi-automatic rifles fire off bullets more quickly. However, lots of gun control advocates are calling for stricter measures, like banning high capacity magazines or semi-automatic firearms altogether.

Ring Any Bells?

In reality, white men pose a larger domestic terror threat than Muslims, but that hasn't been acknowledged by the White House.

There Have Been Other Deadlier Attacks

The difference between Trump's reaction to mass murders committed by white men versus by Muslims is making some people downright angry.

This Mob Photo

This photo is reminiscent of the white supremacist marches that have been happening across the United States. Those marches, which have proven to be threats to American people, have not been so heavily condemned.

"Thoughts & Prayers" Vs. "Not In The U.S.A."

When Trump offered his "thoughts and prayers," people were upset that he didn't call for stricter gun legislation.

"Both Sides"

This tweet lays out the basics: Trump hasn't been so quick to condemn white supremacists or white Americans in general.

"Such A Lacking Response"

The "like you in every way" part of this tweet is totally beside the point. But when it comes down to it, people are disappointed in how the president has handled terrorist attacks thus far.

It's important to point out that the problem here is not the sole fact that Trump tweeted, "not in the U.S.A." It goes without saying that no one wants terrorist attacks to happen here or anywhere. Instead, the issue lies within how Trump has, in comparison, been slow to condemn white supremacy or white gunmen in the past. True, terrorism absolutely does not belong in the U.S.A., but neither do mass shooters and racism.