Sex

An OB/GYN On The Vaginal Exercises That Will Transform Your Sex Life

A whole new muscle to flex.

Three vaginal exercises that will tighten your vagina and improve your sex life.
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Even if you aren't the biggest fan of exercise, it probably won't take much convincing to give your vagina a workout. Not only does it feel good to pay attention to this area of your body by making little moves throughout the day, but it can also improve your sex life too.

To "work out" your vagina, what you'll really be doing is focusing on your pelvic floor muscles. "Your pelvis is home to muscles and ligaments, forming a stretchy structure for your reproductive system, urinary organs, and the lower portion of your digestive tract," Dr. Sarah de la Torre, an OB/GYN at Joylux, tells Bustle. "While it may seem complicated, it really is just a system of muscles that act as a hammock to support your pelvic organs."

Exercising this area will give you more muscle control, which can play a role in having stronger orgasms and feeling more confident. However, you won't want to get too hung up on the idea that having a "tight" vagina is somehow necessary or better.

"When people talk about vaginal tightness, they’re often talking about feelings of snugness during penetration (for both the vagina and the inserted object/body part)," Dr. Jess O'Reilly, a relationship therapist and resident sexologist for ASTROGLIDE, tells Bustle. "However, tighter is not always better when it comes to pleasure or orgasm."

Sometimes tightness can be uncomfortable — even painful — so you'll want to check with your doctor if that's the case. "Instead of worrying about how 'tight' your vagina is," O'Reilly says, "consider what feels good for you. What types of touch turn you on? What fantasies get you going? What types of connection are erotically arousing?"

With that in mind, here are a few exercises that might be fun to try.

1

Flex Your Kegels

Kegel exercises are always at the top of the list when it comes to pelvic floor workouts, and for good reason. "The age old trick of doing kegel exercises every day can improve the quality of sex," de la Torre says, particularly if you've recently had a baby or have a weak pelvic floor.

"Contracting your pelvic muscles will help strengthen the entire area and can make sex feel more pleasurable," she says. "To identify your pelvic floor muscles, stop urination in midstream." It's that clenching-down sensation that you'll want to replicate when doing kegels.

"Once you've identified your pelvic floor muscles you can do the exercises in any position," de la Torre says. "You can imagine you are sitting on a marble and tighten your pelvic muscles as if you're lifting the marble. Try it for three seconds at a time, then relax for a count of three. Aim for at least three sets of 10 to 15 repetitions a day."

2

Work On Your Posture

When it comes to posture, you might think about your back and shoulders. But healthy posture is crucial for pelvic floor strength and health, too. So take a second to analyze how you stand and move around, first focusing on your butt.

"If you catch yourself clenching your glutes when you stand, it’s time to stop this bad habit," de la Torre says. "Muscles work best when they can contract and relax naturally. Squeezing your glutes for long periods can make them weaker."

Now think about your back. "Arching your back slightly while you stand pushes your hips out of alignment," she says. "The best way to align your hips is to stack them under your ribs."

And finally, consider your core. "Focusing on your lower abdominal muscles can help you engage your pelvic floor," de la Torre says. To target this area with exercise, try yoga, pilates, or do ab workouts on an exercise ball.

If you work on building core strength, you'll have an easier time maintaining good posture — and your pelvic floor.

3

Do Squats

While you might already do squats to work out your glutes, pre-pregnancy fitness expert Nicole Brodie tells Bustle that squats are also beneficial for the pelvic floor muscles, because they work as a type of kegel.

To do squats, stand with your feet a bit wider than shoulder-width, lower yourself until your thighs are just below parallel to the floor, and stand back up with your weight in your heels. Brodie recommends doing them against a wall for at least 10 seconds to engage your pelvic floor muscles.

Try these exercises and see if they have an impact on how you feel during sex. Do keep in mind, though, that "tightness" isn't the goal. As O'Reilly says, it's all about keeping your muscles "functional."

Experts:

Dr. Sarah de la Torre, OB/GYN

Dr. Jess O'Reilly, relationship therapist and sexologist

Nicole Brodie, pre-pregnancy fitness expert