What Is Twitter Connect? The New Feature Gives You Incredibly Specific Suggestions For Which Users To Follow

In an effort to further personalize the popular social media platform, make for a more engaging experience, and hopefully boost a lagging performance, Twitter has officially introduced a way for mobile users to more easily find other tweeters they might be interested in: Twitter Connect. But what is Twitter Connect, exactly? It's similar to a feature that already exists — the "Who to Follow" list that appears when you view Twitter in an actual web browser — only a lot more specific in who it suggests you follow. It's also a mobile-only feature.

Here's the deal:

Twitter Connect zeroes in on your interests even further than "Who to Follow" does, looking at users you're already following, tweets you have liked, well-known accounts in your area (bringing Twitter to the local level), and current world news and events. On iOS devices, you can access it by clicking on the little person icon in the top left corner of your main newsfeed; Android users, meanwhile, can find it along the menu bar.

I'm personally finding the new feature to be pretty cool to explore. While many social media platforms still only suggest users to follow based on how many friends you have in common (which isn't bad — just somewhat limiting), Connect is taking it one step further with factoring in your personal interests that you express across Twitter.

Here, let's take a look at it in action. Connect sees that I'm obsessed with ABC's Shark Tank and that I follow all the investors, so it gave me more suggestions based on that:

It also noticed that I liked another writer's tweet, so it suggested other writers that I might be interesting in connecting with:

Twitter has been experimenting with a few new things as of late, some of which have been better recieved than others — but this is one new feature that I am A-OK with. Connect doesn't have to change anything for you, if you don't want it to; however, it's a cool new update that makes social networking just a bit more networky. And that sounds just peachy to me.

Images: Megan Grant/Bustle (2)