Therapy Is A New Method To Heal Zits (And Other Skin Conditions), But Is The Pricey Treatment Really Practical?

A victim of violence (L) speaks with a psychologist on November 23, 2011 at the association L'Escale (StopOver), a foster and housing center protecting women against marital violence, in Gennevilliers, near Paris. AFP PHOTO ALEXANDER KLEIN (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER KLEIN/AFP/Getty Images)
Source: ALEXANDER KLEIN/AFP/Getty Images

Food lovers, rejoice! Gluten, wine, and dairy face may not be causing those breakouts after all. So continue to indulge (in moderation, of course) without guilt. The bad news? The treatment for your skin woes might be far more costly than cutting out food groups. A new study is claiming that cognitive behavioral therapy might heal skin conditions. It sounds interesting enough, but honestly, life was a lot simpler when benzoyl peroxide was the answer to every zit.

We all know that stress can cause hives and breakouts (even Solange broke out in hives on her wedding day), but the American Psychological Association has found that other psychological issues can contribute to common skin problems such as acne, psoriasis, eczema, and hives. Cognitive behavioral therapy (i.e. the way psychologists treat mental health conditions) might help heal these dermatological conditions, too. 

In theory, it might be brilliant, but in practicality? I'm skeptical. Just give me a cream to throw on, or a clay mask to dry those guys up and I'm good. Therapy is not only expensive, it's time consuming, and as a means to fix skin problems, it might not be the best bet. Personally, whatever baggage I have will be left in my suitcase for now, fingers crossed it doesn't pop up on my face anytime soon, though.

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Images: Getty Images; Giphy

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