5 Times Emma Watson Proved She's A Feminist Hero During Her International Women's Day Q&A

English actress Emma Watson poses for pictures on the red carpet upon arrival to attend the British Fashion Awards 2014 in London on December 1, 2014. AFP PHOTO/JUSTIN TALLIS (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
Source: JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images
If Hermione Granger were an actual living person, she would probably be the real-life Emma Watson. In honor of International Women's Day, Watson held a live Q&A session that revisited key points from her United Nations speech on gender equality that launched the HeforShe campaign last year. Watson acknowledged that her UN speech may not have allowed her adequate time to elaborate on some of her ideas regarding gender equality, ideas that she says were difficult to cram into one short speech, and she spoke in more detail about the goals and objectives of the HeforShe campaign which aims to include men in the gender equality movement. Watson also touched on issues like online harassment, self-identifying as a feminist, and the sometimes subtle ways gender inequality can manifest itself. 

She later took questions from the audience and also spoke about some of her own personal experience being the subject of sexist jokes within her own family, giving insight into her personal connection to issues of gender equality by saying she's felt connected to the cause since she was young.

Watson's representation of the HeforShe campaign has launched her into mainstream feminist hero status, and she says she's still working to get more of her fans on board with issues of gender equality. Here are five time Watson proved she's a gender equality superhero during her HehorShe Q&A on Sunday:

"If you stand for equality, you're a feminist"

"Sorry to tell you," she added. 

"Don't let anyone tell you what you can or cannot do"

She said: "It doesn't need to be like that."

"We just want to be included"


"Don't have expectations based on the gender you see in front of you," she said. 

"Channel that anger"

"It starts young with boys and girls being told what they have to be, and it can be really damaging," she explained.

"Be brave enough to acknowledge that things aren't there yet"

She concluded: "We need to understand that we are complicit[...]translate the passion into really doing something."

Images: Giphy (2); Bustle/Twitter (3)

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