What Movies Are Leaving Netflix In April? A Lot Of Classics You Need To Enjoy One Last Time

Picture taken on September 11, 2014 to illustrate the on-demand internet streaming media provider, Netflix, on the home video game console PlayStation 3 in Stockholm. The online streaming website Netflix will be launched in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Belgium and Luxembourg mid-September. It is already operating in Scandinavian countries. AFP PHOTO/JONATHAN NACKSTRAND (Photo credit should read JONATHAN NACKSTRAND/AFP/Getty Images)
Source: JONATHAN NACKSTRAND/AFP/Getty Images

Although by now we're used to Netflix softly breaking our hearts every month when they take movies and TV shows off their streaming list every month, it seems that, as a particularly mean April Fool's joke, Netflix is depriving us of access to a ton of great stuff come April 1st. Thus, it's that familiar time of month, where you enter that scramble to watch what's going to be be gone in a few short weeks.

There's always hope, however, because whenever Netflix puts movies and shows in the vault, they put out some great new releases. March was a banger of a month, most notably with the runaway hit The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt starring Ellie Kemper. (Do you know what Pinot Noir means yet? If not, you should.) Thankfully, if you check the list of what's coming to Netflix in April, there are at least a few titles on the list that will take the edge off the pain from what's leaving.

It looks like we're gonna lose an interesting mix of cheesy-but-great movies, cult films and a few classics. The entire Karate Kid trilogy is about to disappear from your queue, so, if you only have time to watch one of the following, that's probably the right choice, for nostalgia's sake. 

Here are all the must-watches before it's too late.

Clue (1985) 

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Totally underrated dramatization of the classic board game starring Tim Curry as the creepy butler. (But did he do it?) The Netflix version has all three of the alternate endings as a bonus.

Coneheads (1993)

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Film-length version of the Saturday Night Live sketch starring Dan Akroyd and Jane Curtin as aliens with weirdly-shaped craniums that try to adjust to life on Earth. And that scene where her water breaks, though...

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953) 

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An iconic, gorgeous and somewhat campy classic Marilyn.

Sense And Sensibility (1995) 

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Do you love period dramas? Do you love Kate Winslet? Do you love Emma Thompson? This adaptation of the Jane Austen novel is one of the best, with Winslet and Thompson playing the Dashwood sisters, who fall from their high society status and try to woo some Richey Riches (Alan Rickman and Hugh Grant). 

Mystic River (2003) 

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Scary and dark and traumatic experiences and murder and hockey!!

Mystic Pizza (1998) 

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A bildungsroman and a pizza place and Julia Roberts!!

Pee-Wee's Big Adventure (1988) 

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Did you know this movie, based on the children's TV show, is the first full-length feature that Tim Burton directed? A cult classic.

The Amityville Horror (1979)

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Even though it got panned by critics, I still maintain that the 1979 version of The Amityville Horror is much better than the 2005 remake. Stars Josh Brolin's dad James as George Lutz, who moves into a house where — surprise! — a gruesome murder happened, and he goes crazy. Pretty straightforward. 

The Woman Who Wasn't There (2012)

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This documentary is BANANAS. It tells the story of Alicia Esteve Heads, who claimed to have survived the September 11 attacks, leading many support groups until it's exposed that she definitely WAS NOT in New York, let alone the World Trade Center, on the day of the tragedy. 

The Karate Kid Series (1984 - 1986) 

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Even though it's a truth universally acknowledged that only the original Karate Kid was excellent, you might as well watch Karate Kid II and Karate Kid III for old time's sake. Or not, because they are terrible. Note: does not include The Next Karate Kid, which is also terrible. 

Good Morning, Vietnam (1987) 

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If you're still not over Robin Williams' untimely death, you might wanna skip this one, but I think that, if you watch this, you'll remember why you love him so much. In this comedy about the Vietnam War, Williams plays a radio DJ in Saigon, and he's at his best — he improved a ton of his broadcasts in the film.

Those are the essentials, though other departures that are worthy of a watch if time permits (and we know your time always permits for Netflix) include Philadelphia with Tom Hanks, The Cable Guy, and The Whole Nine Yards, which will make you wonder why Amanda Peet isn't in more movies. Get to watching, people! There are only a few weeks left.

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