18 Millennial Women Discuss What It Was Like Being Cut Off From Their Parents
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Money is a feminist issue — and yet, women are still reluctant to talk about it. According to a recent Bustle survey of more than 1,000 millennial women, more than 50 percent of people said they never discuss personal finances with friends, even though 28 percent reported feeling stressed out about money every single day. That’s why Bustle launched Grown-A$$ Finances, a series that gets real about what millennial women are doing with their money, and why — because managing your money should feel empowering, not intimidating.

Chances are, you've been there. You graduate high school or college and your parents cut you off, financially speaking. They love you, but now you're on your own. Or maybe they still keep you on their health and/or car insurance for a few more years.

"The first thing that you should do when your parents cut you off is take inventory — understand how much money you have coming in and where it's coming from," Canon Hickman, wealth manager at Equity Concepts, tells Bustle. "The last thing you want to do is have your card get declined at dinner, and you have to ask your friends to pick up the bill. From a practical perspective, you might want to try having two separate checking accounts — have your paycheck auto-deposited into your primary checking account and have all of your bills get automatically drawn from that. Then, take the remaining income that you want to spend, and have that auto-transfer into your second 'spending' account. Also, resist the urge to keep the money tree growing by getting a credit card. It might feel good to have that extra cash now, but you're digging a hole that's hard to get yourself out of."

Where was Hickman when I got out of college?! Great advice, right? Now, I'll share how 18 Millennial women dealt with life after being cut off from their parents. Hint: They survived — woo-hoo! — and below is how they did it, and continue to do so.

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Fellow Millennial Lauren Zangardi Haynes, 33, CFP(r) and CIMA (Certified Investment Management Analyst) at Evolution Advisers, agrees, and has some final words of advice. "In addition to my job, I blog about money/financial planning at Words on Wealth, and I know it can be nerve-wracking to be pushed from the proverbial nest," she tells Bustle. "But as they say, 'knowledge is power,' so take control of your spending and work out a rough budget. It's not nearly as painful as you think. Try Mint.com or YNAB.com if your bank doesn't offer free budgeting software. Google Docs also offers some budget outlines. I always encourage my clients to think of this as a spending plan, not a budget — you choose what you spend your money on, so choose wisely."

See? So it's not as bad as you think when you go out into the world on your own. You'll see.

Check out the “Grown-A$$ Finances” stream in the Bustle App for more tips and tricks on how to save and spend your money.