Can You Take Too Much CBD? Here’s What Happens If You Do

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I've been trying out the cannabis compound cannabidiol (better known as CBD) lately as an all-natch way to provide some additional relief from my anxiety, insomnia, and chronic pain. If you're taking CBD too, perhaps you've also googled: Can you take too much CBD? In order for CBD to be toxic to your system, you would have to ingest almost 20,000 mg of CBD oil in a very short amount of time, according to a 2011 study published in the journal Current Drug Safety. But that doesn't mean you can take gummy after gummy just because they taste like candy.

With the 2018 Hemp Act, part of the 2018 Farm Bill, signed Dec. 20, 2018, all products derived from industrially farmed hemp grown in the U.S. are now legal in all 50 states, ending a more than 80-year ban of large-scale hemp farming in this country. This means that this year is really where CBD is going to hit the mainstream, as Well+Good's 2019 wellness forecast suggested. This *also* means it will be a lot easier for researchers to test CBD and its effects, which was previously difficult because of federal regulations around hemp. Hence why scientists aren't yet 100 percent conclusive on CBD's effects — and why it's important to educate yourself before getting started.

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When CBD oil first began to hit the scene, and my brother recommended it for my anxiety and migraine headaches, I was reluctant to give it a try. I am one of those people for whom cannabis induces extreme paranoia — the kind that makes me want to hide under the bed — and I wanted to make sure CBD wouldn't have the same effect. After reading several studies, and learning that CBD oil does not contain THC, the active ingredient in cannabis that gets you high, I decided to give it a go.

CBD comes in a variety of delivery methods. While the gummies I've sampled are certainly delicious, I tend to treat them like candy. Translation: I want to eat the entire bottle, which is probably not the best idea. There are also drops, sprays, applicators, vaporizers, softgels, and more.

On its website, PlusCBD Oil, which is one of the first CBD companies to be certified by the U.S. Hemp Authority Guidance Program, recommended that people new to CBD oil start with softgels or capsules because they offer pre-portioned amounts of CBD. "Since everyone is different, we recommend starting with the smallest dosage possible and seeing how it affects you," PlusCBD Oil advised on its website. "From there you can work your way up to stronger doses and different systems until you find a dosage and type that suits your individual needs."

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Because CBD oils are not currently regulated by the FDA, choosing the right one can be daunting, and sometimes a little bit sketchy. Luckily, you can head over to the website CBD Oil Review to research different brands. It's also important to note that just because it's unlikely you can take enough CBD oil to endanger your health, taking too much CBD could make you feel bajiggity. Also, studies have found that CBD oil is known to interact with certain medications, so make sure to consult your doctor or pharmacist if you're currently taking any prescriptions.

Even though CBD oil that only contains CBD will not get your high, once you reach your therapeutic dose, taking more will likely just make you want to take a nap. Studies have found that in some people CBD can cause diarrhea, changes in appetite, and fatigue. Follow the dosage directions to get the best results.