Does Trump Color His Hair? Michael Wolff's Book Claims Ivanka Mocked His Hue

President Donald Trump confuses much of the world, but one particular characteristic causes more bewilderment than any other. Trump's hair has been the inspiration behind jokes, wigs, costumes, and even think pieces, though no one can quite figure it out — until now, perhaps. According to Michael Wolff's new tell-all book, Fire and Fury: Inside Trump's White House, first daughter Ivanka often made jokes about Trump's hair color and routine to friends.

Ahead of the book's release Jan. 9, New York published an excerpt detailing Ivanka's unconventional relationship with her father, as Wolff put it, in which she mocks his comb-over.

She often described the mechanics behind it to friends: an absolutely clean pate — a contained island after scalp-reduction ­surgery — surrounded by a furry circle of hair around the sides and front, from which all ends are drawn up to meet in the center and then swept back and secured by a stiffening spray.

He goes on to claim the president's orange-ish hair color comes from a Just for Men product that gets darker the longer its left on. "Impatience resulted in Trump's orange-blond hair color," according to Wolff, who also said Ivanka points out the color of Trump's hairdo "to comical effect."

Wolff spent 18 months with the president, conducting more than 200 interviews with Trump's entourage in order to capture his personality in a book. As the president's oldest daughter and close political adviser, Ivanka's role in the White House comes up quite a bit.

"For Ivanka, it was all business — building the Trump brand, the presidential campaign, and now the White House," according to Wolff. "She treated her father with a degree of detachment, even irony, going so far as to make fun of his comb-over to others."

While it's not uncommon for a daughter to jokingly roast her aging dad about his hair, Ivanka has never done so in public. In fact, she's been criticized for being too agreeable when it comes to her father. As she told The Financial Times in September:

To voice dissent publicly would mean I'm not part of the team. When you're part of a team, you're part of a team. That doesn't mean everyone in the White House has homogenous views — we don't, and I think that's good and healthy — but that doesn't mean we're publicly undermining (each other) and this administration.

But according to Wolff's book, that doesn't stop her from mocking Trump's 'do in private.

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The excerpt revealed almost as much about Ivanka as it did the president, claiming she and her husband moved to Washington in the hopes that Ivanka would take over the Oval Office one day.

Between themselves, the two had made an earnest deal: If sometime in the future the opportunity arose, she'd be the one to run for president. The first woman president, Ivanka entertained, would not be Hillary Clinton; it would be Ivanka Trump.

Former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon was reportedly horrified when he heard of Ivanka's alleged presidential scheme. Bannon, who's recently fallen out of Trump's inner circle, also reportedly called Ivanka "dumb as a brick" and "a nonevent on the campaign," according to Wolff's account.

Regardless of how Bannon feels, the first daughter remains in her father's good graces; recently she played a role in getting the GOP's tax bill through Congress. As Wolff wrote:

Ivanka and Jared were as much the chief of staff as Priebus or Bannon.

As such, it seems her reported jokes at the expense of her dad's hairdo haven't rustled any feathers yet.