Netflix Has Even More True Crime Shows & Movies Than You Realize — And They're ALL Must-Sees

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Without question, true crime has become one of the leading genres in TV and movies over the last few years. Viewers consistently choose real-life tales of gruesome murders when picking a show or movie to watch, and every streaming site offers a plethora of options to choose from. The offerings on Netflix, HBO Go, Amazon Prime, and Hulu will almost always satisfy your true crime needs, but one site stands out more than the others. Netflix has the highest amount of true crime content to stream, hands down.

Considering that the service seems to always be churning out a new great true crime docu-series like Making a Murderer or Evil Genius, it's probably not a huge surprise that Netflix comes out on top. If you search strategically through the site's collection, you'll be able to find an entire True Crime category. First you have to select the Crime genre, then you need to scroll down to the True Crime list and select "explore," so you are redirected to a page that includes Netflix's entire collection of serial-killer content. At that point, you've discovered one of Netflix's micro-genres, of which The Atlantic reports there are almost 77,000. Then, it's up to you to choose from Netflix's many docu-series, documentary films, or movies or shows based on true-crime events, like American Crime Story: The People v. O.J. Simpson.

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If dramatized re-enactments of true crime isn't your thing, though, that's OK, because you have plenty of docudrama to absorb. In fact, Netflix has over 40 true-crime movies and shows that don't involve any actors at all. Can real life really be that twisted? Apparently so, because if you look at all of the options for Netflix's true crime content, you'll quickly realize that the streaming giant doesn't even have to include repeated events in their repertoire.

Of course, you probably know the most popular true crime shows on Netflix like Making a Murderer or The Keepers, but there are so many other options that you probably don't even know about. For example, you can check out Shadow of Truth, which investigates the murder of an Israeli teenager, Tair Rada, whose death led to a dubious trial.

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Even though Netflix has the largest repertoire of true crime shows and movies of any major streaming site, that doesn't mean that the others don't have plenty to offer themselves. Hulu only has a few true-crime movies, but it has around 20 shows that follow real life crimes. For example, Hulu offers CNN's Crimes of the Century series and ABC's Truth and Lies series, which focuses on specific criminals like the Mendendez brothers and Charles Manson.

A great streaming option for finding documentaries about more recent true crime stories is HBO Go, which offers around 10 true crime documentary movies and series and a few movies and shows that resemble the true-crime format. Even if HBO has far fewer options than Netflix, the ones featured have made quite the impression viewers. Just take the infamous doc Mommy Dead and Dearest, or the ultra-popular series The Jinx about Robert Durst.

In addition to those already well-known titles, HBO has a lot of other great true crime movies and shows to check out, including Beware the Slenderman, The Cheshire Murders, There's Something Wrong with Aunt Diane, and the three-part series, Paradise Lost: The Child Murders at Robin Hood Hills.

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Amazon Prime, meanwhile, has around 13 true crime docu-series, none of which are too well-known. Yet while that may make it seem like a less desirable streaming site to go to for true crime, it might win in another way. Amazon Prime has a lot of great crime TV shows, like Goliath, Prime Suspect: Tennison and Tin Star, and it's the perfect site to go to to get more narrative, and possibly longer-lasting crime content, that may or may not be based on real events.

The great thing about being a true crime fan is that you're never in short supply of new shows or movies to watch, especially not with Netflix killing the genre — no pun intended.