Resealable Rose Wine Cans From The Drop Wine Are Here To Save Your Summer Picnics

Canned wine is definitely having a moment — and it’s no wonder why: Cans are more portable than bottles; they let less air and light in, cutting down on oxidization; they’re recyclable; and they’re perfect for summertime picnics. But they do have one problem: You can’t reseal them… or can you? Thanks to the Drop’s new resealable canned wine, you don’t have to finish a can of wine all in one sitting. Right now, the resealable cans are only available for the brand’s rosé — but who knows? If they take off, more varieties of wine could soon become available in the innovative packaging. Heck, and yes.

The Drop launched in 2016 with just one wine: Their rosé. As TIME reported that year, canned wine wasn’t new; in 2013, Union Wine Company had seen a dramatic success with their Underwood wine cans. But as the Drop founder and CEO Alexis Beechen told Like A Boss Girls in March of 2018, the Drop sought to fill a specific niche. “Why can’t we drink canned wine that comes in an eco-friendly, single-serve size?” she asked. “Isn’t it more important to make the best wine possible for a great price, rather than focusing on vintages?”

What’s more, Beechen wondered why wine brands had to be perceived as aloof and unapproachable in order for the wine itself to be seen as good — or, as she put it, “Why can’t wine companies interface with their customers on social media, and talk about relatable things like Monday struggles and texting, while still being perceived as a fine wine?” The goal of the Drop was to “[tackle] all of those challenges,” filling a desire many people — millennials in particular — had for “their wine to be a more accurate reflection the world they live in.”

Since then, the Drop’s offerings have expanded; they now produce their signature Provence style, dry rosé blend, as well as a red blend of Zinfandel, Syrah, and Petite Sirah and a white Sauvignon Blanc blend. They’re all made in California, and can be purchased online for $44.99 for 12 cans or $79.99 for 24 cans. (The math works out to about $3.75 per can if you buy a 12-pack and $3.33 if you buy a 24-pack. If you were to buy the wine in a regular bottle, you’d be looking at around a range of $10 to $12 per bottle.)

The Drop’s cans, typically hold 250ml of wine — that is, just shy of an 8.5-ounce glass. They’re meant to be single-serving, a goal they accomplish with panache. But what if you crack one open, then decide to, say, relocate from the park to the beach? What if you’ve been on a boozy boat trip (obviously with a sober designated driver at the wheel), but haven’t quite finished your drink by the time you dock? Those are the kinds of situations the resealable cans, which launched this year, are meant to solve: They hold 375ml — about a half-bottle of wine — and allow you to put the lid back on and stash them away for later in the event that you don’t quite finish them before you need to move on.

“Safer than glass, easier to recycle, and more stable than a corked bottle, the Drop’s 250ml single-servings have been a hit with active and adventurous wine drinkers,” said Beechen according to FoodBev Media. “Now we’ve revolutionized our cans to make them even more mobile. Our new 375ml, half-bottle can with a retractable lid allows you to easily move the part from the boat to the beach or the lodge to the lake without spillage.”

Here's what it looks like in practice:

The Drop Wine on YouTube

Instead of popping open with a standard pull-tab, the cans have a mechanism at the mouth that allow you to sort of… slide back the tab, locking it into place once it’s open. Then, when you want to close it again, you simply unlock the tab, slide it back into the closed position, and re-lock it. FoodBev Media reports that the can’s resealable lid was developed in Germany.

Now This’ video on the wine observes that the tab does take a little bit of getting-used-to — but if the videos on the Drop’s own YouTube channel are to believed, they do actually work. Once they’re sealed, claim the videos, the cans can apparently survive a backflip:

The Drop Wine on YouTube

A trip to the skate park:

The Drop Wine on YouTube

Cartwheels:

The Drop Wine on YouTube

And a day spent riding the waves:

The Drop Wine on YouTube

I mean, yes, these are promotional videos, so take them with a grain of salt — but hey, at least we know the kinds of stress that seal is meant to withstand, right? If you can turn a cartwheel, you can even go ahead and test it out for yourself.

The Drop’s wines can all be purchased online; head here to get a hold of the resealable rosé. Enjoy that picnic!