When Does 'Doctor Who' Season 9 Hit Netflix? 6 Episodes You Need To Rewatch ASAP

I think we can all agree that Doctor Who Season 9 was definitely some of Peter Capaldi's best work as the time-traveling doctor. Not only was he able to punch his way (quite literally) through his own worst nightmares, but he was also faced with yet another emotional goodbye from a much beloved companion. And while we still have the highly anticipated Doctor Who Christmas episode "The Husbands of River Song" to look forward to in the coming weeks, I can't help but yearn to relive the magic of this past season all over again. Which leaves me with one very important question: When will Doctor Who Season 9 start streaming on Netflix?

Unfortunately for us, we most likely have quite a wait ahead of us before that joyous day arrives. While no official release date has been announced, I think it's safe to assume the series will follow the same sort of pattern that it did during this past year. For example, Season 8 made its Netflix debut on Aug. 8, 2015, which was almost one month ahead of Season 9's premiere date on Sept. 19. With that in mind, I'd wager that Doctor Who's ninth season should be on the streaming service by August or September 2016.

Now, I know what you're thinking. That feels like ages and ages away. So much so that you wish you could climb into your own personal TARDIS and make the time literally fly by. (If only!) But even though we're stuck in the present, that doesn't mean we can't look forward to all that is to come, which is why I've compiled a few of my favorite Season 9 episodes we should all make sure to rewatch before Season 10 kicks off. In the words of River Song, be wary of *spoilers* ahead!

"The Magician's Apprentice" — Episode 1

In an interesting twist to the Dalek story, we see the Doctor come face to face with Davros as a young boy and the inevitable fallout that ensues. Also, Missy returns and proves to be just as amazing as ever.

"The Witch's Familiar" — Episode 2

Given that this is the second half of a two-part episode, it wouldn't make much sense to skip over it. Not that you'd ever want to, considering everything that the Doctor goes through, including the regeneration of Davros and almost accidentally killing Clara. You'll be on the edge of your seat for pretty much the entire episode.

"The Woman Who Lived" — Episode 6

If there's one way to make a Doctor Who episode even better, it's adding a Game of Thrones star into the mix. Maisie Williams shines in this episode as "Me" (formerly known as Ashildr) whose immortality has changed her from the young and innocent girl she once was. Capaldi and Williams make for a dynamic team and their characters help each other in ways you'd never expect. An absolute must-see.

"Face the Raven" — Episode 10

As painful and heartbreaking as this episode ended up being, it's also one of the most tender moments we've ever seen between the Doctor and Clara as they say their final goodbyes to one another. So if you're in need of a good cry and don't mind suffering throughout yet another emotional breakdown, this episode has everything you need. It definitely makes you feel all the feels — good, bad, or otherwise.

"Heaven Sent" — Episode 11

After being teleported to an unknown destination immediately following Clara's death, the Doctor finds himself living in a perpetual nightmare for over four billion years. This is one instance where time didn't feel like it was on our Time Lord's side.

"Hell Bent" — Episode 12

After returning to Gallifrey, the Doctor attempts to go back and save Clara from her doomed fate only to discover that in order to do so, he'd need to wipe away all of her memories of him. However, having listened in on his plan, Clara alters the memory-swiping device so that it could end up affecting either one of them. Upon using it, the Doctor forgets all about Clara and doesn't even recognize her as the waitress he's been chatting with. It will leave you emotionally crippled, but eager to see what comes next for our beloved Time Lord.

Images: BBC Worldwide Limited (6); Simon Ridgway/BBC