Celebrity

Jamie Lynn Spears Calls On Media To "Do Better" After Framing Britney Spears

The actor wants the media to learn from its mistakes.

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With the world reexamining the way Britney Spears was treated by the media throughout her career, the singer's sister wants to make sure that everyone has learned their lesson. In a statement posted on her Instagram story on Friday, Feb. 12, Jamie Lynn Spears told the media to "do better" in light of Framing Britney Spears. The documentary, part of The New York Times Presents series on FX and Hulu, has inspired backlash against the paparazzi and TV reporters, who were criticized for misogynistic and condescending treatment of Spears in the early to mid 2000s.

While she didn't explicitly reference the documentary or her sister, Spears shared a message advising the media to learn from the way they mistreated the pop star during the height of Britney's career. "Dear media, try not to repeat the mistakes of your past. Look where that got us. Do better," she wrote on her Instagram story, per E! News. In addition, the Sweet Magnolias star shared a quote reading, "Everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about. Be kind. Always."

In the wake of the documentary's release — and the swell of support that Britney and the #FreeBritney movement have received as a result — Spears has shared her support for her older sister on social media. On Feb. 12, after Nylon's Instagram shared a post about pop star siblings in the early aughts, she revealed that she "never tried" to emulate Britney with her singing career. "There was no competing with the GOAT," Spears wrote.

In addition to garnering even more support for the singer, Framing Britney Spears has led several high-profile figures to apologize for contributing to the negative public sentiment surrounding her in the mid-aughts. On Feb. 10, Sarah Silverman addressed her roast of the "Gimme More" singer at the 2007 MTV VMAs, which took place in the midst of Britney's custody battle with ex Kevin Federline and after several high-profile tabloid stories about her mental state. "[She's] 25 years old and she's already accomplished everything she's going to accomplish in her life," the comedian said in the roast. She also referred to the singer's sons, Sean Preston and Jayden James, as "the most adorable mistakes you will ever see."

"MTV asked me to mini-roast Britney after her big performance," Silverman wrote on Twitter, after after a social media user asked her to "explain" her comments in the resurfaced clip. "While she was performing I was having diarrhea & going over my jokes. Had no idea she didn’t kill. Unfortunate. Art changes over yrs as we know more & the world changes. ... I wish I could delete it but I can’t."

On Feb. 12, Justin Timberlake finally responded to the backlash he received as a result of the documentary and its claims that he "weaponized" his 2002 breakup with Britney against her in the press. "I am deeply sorry for the times in my life where my actions contributed to the problem, where I spoke out of turn, or did not speak up for what was right," he wrote on Instagram, before acknowledging that he has benefitted from the systems that harmed the careers of women. "I understand that I fell short in these moments and in many others. ... I specifically want to apologize to Britney Spears and Janet Jackson both individually, because I care for and respect these women and I know I failed."

Britney herself has not publicly or explicitly commented on Framing Britney Spears, but she did share a cryptic message on Instagram shortly after the documentary premiered that appeared to address it. "I’ll always love being on stage .... but I am taking the time to learn and be a normal person," she wrote on Feb. 9, alongside a video of her performing "Toxic" in Las Vegas. "Each person has their story and their take on other people’s stories !!!! ... Remember, no matter what we think we know about a person's life it is nothing compared to the actual person living behind the lens!!!!"