#CoverTheAthlete Campaign Calls Out The Sexist Questions Aimed At Female Athletes By Doing Some Pointed Role Swapping — VIDEO

NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 11: Serena Williams of the United States returns a shot to Roberta Vinci of Italy during their Women's Singles Semifinals match on Day Twelve of the 2015 US Open at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on September 11, 2015 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)
Source: Maddie Meyer/Getty Images Sport/Getty Images

Female athletes have a lot of inequality to contend with, from less pay to less publicity — and even when they do get press coverage, it often comes with its own sexist overtones. But now there's a new campaign hoping to end the sexist questions aimed at female athletes: Cover The Athlete. Or, #CoverTheAthlete, if you will. 

Sexist press questions aren't just found in the world of sports, of course. You can find them leveled at musicians, at actresses, and even at astronauts. And just as the #AskHerMore campaign pushes against the sexism lobbed at women on the red carpet, #CoverTheAthlete highlights the problems in how female athletes are treated by the media. 

In a video created to call attention to the issue, #CoverTheAthlete takes real questions that have been asked of female athletes and pairs them up with clips of male athletes and how they might respond to hearing such a question. It really goes to show that what we consider to be "normal" and "par for the course" when it comes to women actually sounds ridiculous if aimed at men. And that's a pretty good indication that something needs to change. 

Female athletes are athletes, just as male athletes are athletes. And they deserve the same respect. 

These questions have all been asked of real female athletes. How might male athletes respond to them?

1. "Any Response To Recent Comments About Your Girlish Figure?"

"Are you serious?"

2. "How Has Your Weight Gain Affected Your Mobility?"

"I don't know what you're talking about."

3. "Removing Your Body Hair Gives You An Edge In The Pool — How About Your Love Life?"

[Confused and uncomfortable stares]

4. "Give Us A Twirl?" 

"What?"

It's weird, right? So why isn't it considered weird when women are asked the same questions? 

Watch the full video below

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You can find out more about the h]Cover The Athlete campaignereCover The Athlete campaign — and more examples of sexist press coverage — at their website. 

Images: CoverTheAthlete/YouTube (4)

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